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    Archived pages: 59 . Archive date: 2013-05.

  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: .. US-Japan Leadership Program.. |.. Grants Programs.. Application Procedures.. Reporting Procedures.. Recent Grants.. Distinguished Service Award.. Grant Programs.. Pre-college Education.. Communication / Public Opinion.. US-Japan Policy.. Elgin Heinz Award.. Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award.. Information in Japanese.. Sign up for our current newsletter.. Foundation News.. Letters of Inquiry for the Foundation's Spring 2013 funding cycle are due by December 15, 2012.. Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award Applications are due February 1, 2013.. The Foundation announces grants awarded during its.. April 2012 funding cycle.. The 2012 Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award  ...   here.. The United States-Japan Foundation is committed to promoting stronger ties between Americans and Japanese by supporting projects that foster mutual knowledge and education, deepen understanding, create effective channels of communication, and address common concerns in an increasingly interdependent world.. Contact Information.. New York Office.. (Headquarters).. 145 East 32nd Street.. New York, NY 10016.. Tel: (212) 481-8753.. Fax: (212) 481-8762.. info@us-jf.. org.. Tokyo Office.. Reinanzaka Bldg.. 1F.. 1-14-2 Akasaka.. Minato-ku, Tokyo.. 107-0052, Japan.. Tel: (03) 3586-0541.. Fax: (03) 3586-1128.. infotokyo-usjf@nifty.. com.. About Us.. Contact Us.. | 2011 United States- Japan Foundation..

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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: |.. Reporting Procedures.. Home.. /.. Grants Programs.. link here.. The United States-Japan Foundation offers grants in the areas of pre-college education, communication / public opinion, and US-Japan policy studies.. In addition, the Foundation operates the United States-Japan Leadership Program.. For more details about each program, please choose a link on the left.. | 2007 United States- Japan Foundation..

    Original link path: /grants_programs.html
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: Application Process.. Deadlines.. Notes Limitations.. Full Proposal Guidelines.. Renewal Proposal Guidelines.. Frequently Asked Questions.. The Application Process.. After carefully reviewing the.. Notes and Limitations.. section below, please submit a Letter of Inquiry of 3-4 pages.. This should include: a brief description of the proposed project and its objectives, any necessary background information on the project and applicant, and a brief budget estimate.. Letters of Inquiry may be written in either Japanese or English.. The Foundation welcomes the opportunity to discuss projects with prospective grantees.. Click here for contact information.. Letters of Inquiry will be reviewed by the Foundation's staff upon receipt and a response will be sent as soon as possible.. If the Letter of Inquiry fits within USJF's funding guidelines and there is interest, the applicant will be invited to prepare a Full Proposal.. Click here.. to see a description of the Full Proposal format and content guidelines.. Please note that unsolicited Full Proposals will not be reviewed and will not be returned to the applicant.. Top.. Application Deadlines.. The Foundation welcomes Letters of Inquiry anytime during the year, but not later than December 15 for the Spring Grant Cycle and July 15 for the Fall Grant Cycle.. The Foundation cannot gurantee that Letters of Inquiry received after these dates will be considered for the current grant cycle.. Letters  ...   will be reviewed and they may have to wait for the next cycle.. December 15-Janaury 15.. will be reviewed and responses sent as soon as possible.. January 31.. Deadline for receipt of.. Full Proposal.. (only invited Full Proposals will be considered).. February/March.. Internal / External review of.. Full Proposals.. April.. USJF Board of Trustees meet to review.. , make funding decisions.. May.. Funding decisions announced.. October Funding Cycle.. By July 15.. July 15-July 31.. August 31.. (only invited full proposals will be considered).. September.. October.. November.. Before applying for a grant, please take the time to carefully review the following notes and limitations:.. The following types of projects fall outside of the Foundation's guidelines:.. undergraduate education, cultural performances or exhibitions, student exchanges, sports exchanges, publication subsidies (unless directly related to a current USJF project), and scientific research.. Grants cannot be made to individuals or for-profit organizations.. Foundation grants may not be used for lobbying or to support election to public offices.. The Foundation does not award grants as contributions to capital campaigns, endowment funds, deficit operations or for the construction or maintenance of buildings or other physical premises.. The Foundation accepts no responsibility for keeping any part of a request confidential and reserves the right to discuss a proposal with outside consultants to assist the program staff in its evaluation..

    Original link path: /application_procedures.html
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: Suggested Renewal Format.. Grant Reporting Payment Requests.. Suggested Renewal Grant Proposal Format.. The renewal grant proposal is applicable only for those grantees who are in their second (or in rare instances, third) year of activities of a given project.. All other grant applicants should refer to the Suggested Grant Proposal Format.. Overall length of the Renewal Proposal:.. In general, the shorter the better.. Please keep the length of the narrative portion (i.. e.. excluding the expenditure and budget figures) of the proposal to under 4,000 words, using normal font type.. The proposal must be written in English.. Narrative Review of the Preceding Year's Activities:.. In a narrative report of the project's preceding year's activities, please describe how the past year (or in some cases 18 months) of the project achieved what it had planned as described in the original grant proposal.. Rather than an item-by-item listing of the preceding year's activities, a narrative that would give a fuller view of the project and the project team's experiences would be very much appreciated.. For example, if there were any unexpected obstacles (intellectual or logistical), it would be helpful to learn what they were and how they were overcome, or at least how it would be proposed to overcome them in the future.. If the project involved a partner institution with whom you had never worked before, please include your impressions and observations about them.. Please remember that you are not required to convince the Foundation of the merits of your project.. The renewal proposal is more focused on process and progress, since the concept of your project has already been approved.. (Approx.. 1,500-2,000 words) Note: It is understood that in some cases the project may still be on-going at the time of renewal application.. In this case, please submit additional information about the previous year's activities, in the form of the required financial and narrative reports, once the grant is completed.. Project Description of the Upcoming Year:.. Please describe in detail your plans for the upcoming year.. If carried out as planned, what would the coming year look like? Please be as specific as possible, elaborating on words like study, explore, and examine.. What is (are) the specific, concrete objective(s) of the project for the period under consideration? Please focus on the portion of the project that is being considered for a grant, and do not restate the rationale and the overall objective of the entire project.. 2,000 words).. Project Activities Timeline:.. On a separate page, provide a detailed timeline of all the planning and programmatic activities of the project for the coming year.. Include (tentative) dates, tasks, and the staff responsible for implementing each step or activity.. Interim Expenditure Report:.. Please include an expenditure report of the preceding year.. It is understood that in many cases this report must be an interim one.. Where expenses are on-going, please provide the best possible projection.. A suggested format for the expenditure report is attached below for your reference.. Please remember that you are required to submit a final expenditure report on the grant within ninety (90) days of the completion date for the grant.. Check the grant letter for the official completion date.. Suggested Interim Expenditure Report Format.. Note: included figures are for illustrative purposes only and are NOT meant to reflect real, or realistic costs.. Items.. Total Expenditure.. Amount Approved for USJF Grant.. Amount Actually Expended from USJF Grant*.. I.. Salary.. $50,000.. $25,000.. Project Director.. (25% time for 12 months).. Administrative Assistant (50% time for 12 months).. $15,000.. $0.. Secretary (50% time for 12 months).. $10, 000.. II.. Consultants.. $4,400.. $4,200.. International Education Consultant (2 days @ $200 per day).. $400.. $200.. Curriculum Consultant (3 days @ $500 per day).. $1,500.. Japan / America Scholar(s) (5 days @ $500 per day).. $2,500.. III.. Travel.. $36,700.. $30,700.. Tokyo-New York (5 people @ $1,500 per trip x 2 trips).. $10,000.. Hotel (5 people @ $150 per day x 10 days x 2 trips).. Meals (5 people @ $40 per day x 2 trips).. Admission Fees (i..  ...   Many project grants are paid in installments to stabilize cash flow and carry out the Foundation's expenditure responsibility (relatively small grants are an exception).. The first installment is generally paid to the Grantee upon receipt of a properly executed Grant (Contract) Letter.. Refer to the Grant Letter for the payment schedule applicable to your project.. Please remember that any significant expected change in the work or budget plan should be brought to the attention of the Program Officer as soon as possible.. It is important to note that USJF does not automatically pay subsequent installments to the Grantee as indicated in the payment schedule.. The schedule indicates when a particular installment can be paid, provided USJF receives a letter requesting that particular installment.. This Payment Request letter should contain certain basic information about the progress of the grant, but it does not need to be a lengthy report.. Please see the following guide:.. Paragraph 1:.. Official request for release of the next installment (please indicate the project title, grant number, payment amount, and payment number (e.. the 2nd of 4 payments, or the 3rd and final payment)).. Paragraph 2:.. Briefly describe project progress since the last payment request (or start of the project).. Only a basic outline is necessary.. You can note the achievement of certain milestones (e.. assembled the project team, held the first planning meeting, completed the first draft of a book, concluded a site visit), but you are not required to describe the content of those activities in any detail.. Of course, a Grantee is welcome to describe project progress in detail if they so choose (or perhaps because a co-funder requires such a report, and it has already been prepared).. Paragraph 3:.. Briefly indicate the primary intended use of the money being requested (e.. to pay for conference travel costs, project members' salary, production and/or distribution of a report).. Also: If the project has produced certain deliverables or work products (articles, newsletters, meeting agendas, reports, tapes, etc.. ), please include these with your request.. You are not required to send draft versions of reports, chapters, articles, etc.. unless specifically requested by a USJF Program Officer.. If you have questions, please contact your Program Officer.. Please note that the signatory of the Payment Request can be either the Project Director or the original signatory on the grant contract letter.. Grant Final Report (For All Grants).. Please remember that the Grantee is required to submit a final report on the grant within ninety (90) days of the completion date for the grant.. The Final Report has two parts:.. 1.. Final Narrative Report:.. Please describe in general the project's goals, activities and achievements (with reference to the plan as described in the original grant proposal).. Rather than an item-by-item listing of the project activities, a narrative that would give a fuller view of the project and the project team's experiences would be very much appreciated.. If this is final year of a multi-year project, please focus the Final Narrative Report on the final year of activity, but do reflect at some point on the whole project in a broad and comprehensive context.. 2.. Final Expenditure Report:.. Please include an expenditure report for the grant period.. Remember that the Grantee is required to return any unspent funds to the Foundation.. Please review the Grant Letter for accounting and record-keeping requirements.. A suggested format for the Final Expenditure Report is attached below for your reference.. Grant Final Report (For Renewal Grants).. In the case of renewal grants, the renewal proposal will take the place of the Final Narrative Report (please see.. ).. We understand that often the grant year is not fully completed when the renewal proposal is prepared.. As with any grant, please submit a final expenditure report on the grant within ninety (90) days of the completion date for the grant.. This can be submitted separately from the Renewal Grant Proposal.. Please check with a Program Officer if you have questions.. Suggested Final Expenditure Report Format.. This applies to significant budget items..

    Original link path: /current_grantees.html
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: Recent Grants.. Grants Awarded April 2013.. Grants Awarded October 2012.. Grants Awarded April 2012.. Grants Awarded October 2011.. Grants Awarded April 2011.. Grants Awarded October 2010.. Grants Awarded April 2010.. Grants Awarded October 2009.. Grants Awarded April 2009.. Grants Awarded October 2008.. Grants Awarded April 2008.. Grants Awarded October 2007.. Grants Awarded April 2007.. Grants Awarded October 2006.. Grants Awarded April 2006.. Grants Awarded October 2005.. Grants Awarded April 2005..

    Original link path: /recent_grants.php
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: Foundation News.. Press Release.. The United States-Japan Foundation.. Distinquished Service Award.. The United States Japan Foundation established its Distinguished Service Award in 2005.. The award honors American and Japanese individuals for their lifetime commitment to promoting friendship and understanding between the peoples of the United States and Japan.. The Foundation's Board of Trustees selects award recipients and often makes a grant of approximately $10,000 to a US or Japanese not-for-profit organization in honor of the award recipient.. Recipients of the award include:.. 2005.. Ambassador  ...   1980-8.. 2008.. Mr.. Tadashi Yamamoto.. JCIE, President and Founder 1970-2012.. Ambassador Walter F.. Mondale.. US Ambassador to Japan (1993-96).. Vice President of the United States (1977-81).. 2009.. Honorable Yasuhiro Nakasone.. Prime Minister of Japan 1982-87.. 2010.. Honorable Robin Chandler Duke.. Former Ambassador to Norway.. Co-Founder of the US-Japan Foundation.. Dr.. Shoichiro Toyoda.. Honorary Chairman.. Toyota Motor Corporation.. 2011.. Minoru Ben Makihara.. Senior Corporate Advisor and Former Chairman.. Mitsubishi Corporation.. 2012.. Ezra F.. Vogel.. Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, Emeritus.. Harvard University..

    Original link path: /dsa.html
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: Grants.. Pre-College Education.. Pre-college Education Program.. Since 1980, USJF has supported projects that have involved more than 5,000 pre-college teachers in the US and Japan in mutual study and learning on topics related to the US-Japan relationship, including in-depth study of the culture, society and history of both countries.. Through these teachers, as well as through a variety of curriculum materials, web-based collaborative activities, and partnerships between US and Japanese schools, tens of thousands of young people in both countries have begun to study and understand their mutual connections and the importance of the friendship and partnership that binds their two nations so closely.. USJF continues to build upon its past successes and support innovative new programs at the pre-college level in both the US and Japan.. The Foundation seeks to respond to perceived needs at the pre-college level as identified by experts in US-Japan education and practitioners in the field, rather than relying on preconceptions and assumptions.. While proud of successful models of past and present projects (please see the.. recent grants.. section for some examples), USJF continually encourages innovation and creativity in the development of new ways to effectively involve Japanese and American young people in the life-long process of learning about and from each other.. USJF seeks to support programs that.. :.. Take advantage of new technology to bring Japanese and American teachers and students together.. Build human networks among teachers on both sides of the Pacific with a mutual interest in teaching and learning  ...   who will be the future leaders in both countries, forced to come to terms with making policy and responding to the changing nature of the US-Japan relationship.. Enhance, expand and preserve the study of the Japanese language at the pre-college level in the United States through teacher professional development opportunities, national standards, and performance assessments.. Develop curricula and other products immediately relevant to and useful in meeting the demands faced by teachers at the pre-college level; in the case of Japan, this could include materials that address curriculum changes such as the implementation of.. sogoteki na gakushu jikan.. (interdisciplinary studies).. Continue to support and enhance the US-Japan knowledge of the vast network of teachers and students who have been exposed to US-Japan studies over the years through USJF-sponsored programs.. Proposed projects should seek to incorporate one or more of these elements in a way that is particularly suited to the need(s) in pre-college education they seek to address.. That said, the above guidelines should not be seen as a deterrent to innovative new proposals and concepts.. Applicants are encouraged to contact the staff of the Foundation early on in the proposal development process for feedback and guidance.. For a description of the application process, please.. click here.. Comments and questions regarding the guidelines are encouraged.. For more information regarding the Pre-college Education Programs at the United States-Japan Foundation, please contact David Janes, Director of Foundation Grants and Assistant to the President, at.. djanes@us-jf.. or via phone at (212) 481-8757..

    Original link path: /precollege_edu.html
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: Communication and Public Opinion.. Communication and Public Opinion.. Since 1980, the Foundation has supported a variety of projects that seek to enhance communication and mutual understanding between the American and Japanese people.. Technology has evolved, and the institutions and topics of conversation keep changing, but the high value of greater awareness and communication among average citizens, as well as leaders in a variety of fields from our two countries is a constant.. The Foundation will consider communication / public opinion projects that not only raise awareness about Japan in the US and/or US in Japan, but also deal with concrete issues that affect the bilateral relationship (or are faced by the two nations).. As foreign policy increasingly is subject to public opinion (and is often influenced by non-governmental actors), there is a need in both countries for increased and more diversified coverage of international news and current events, as well as strong links between certain non-government organizations (NGOs) to enhance bilateral and multilateral cooperation.. A look at our recent grant activity (.. ) will help potential applicants understand the diversity of projects supported under this program.. The Foundation is constantly  ...   Media.. - Exchange programs, Fellowships, Research, Symposiums, etc.. involving broadcast journalists, editors, or other broadcast media professionals (radio or TV) resulting in professional development and/or a story series or other special coverage.. Internet.. - Communication platforms, moderated discussion groups, links between non-profit organizations (NPOs) or other projects that take advantage of new Internet technologies to enhance communication in support of the Foundation's mission.. NGO / NPO Links.. - Projects of cooperation, communication, education and/or collaboration between US and Japanese Civil Society organizations (in support of the Foundation's mission).. Documentary Film / Video (and other multi-media).. - The Foundation supports documentary films about Japan and the US-Japan relationship.. Opinion Polling / Public Opinion Research.. - Occasionally the Foundation will support such a project if there is demonstrated need and lack of other support from more traditional sources.. Other.. - The categories listed above are not intended to be exhaustive.. The Foundation is always looking for unique approaches to strengthening the US-Japan relationship.. For more information regarding the Communication and Public Opinion Programs at the United States-Japan Foundation, please contact David Janes, Director of Foundation Grants and Assistant to the President, at..

    Original link path: /communication.php
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: US-Japan Policy.. Throughout our 20-year history, the Foundation has supported a variety of policy-related studies, initiatives and exchanges in pursuit of our mission: to promote stronger ties between the United States and Japan through greater mutual knowledge and understanding, to increase broad awareness of important policy issues, and to address common concerns in the Asia-Pacific region through the US-Japan perspective.. The Foundations Policy Program is one category of our grant-making activity.. The other two categories are: 1).. pre-college education.. ; and 2).. communication / public opinion.. To see examples of recent grant activity.. The Foundation is constantly reviewing the relevance and effectiveness of our Programs.. The most recent articulation of our vision for the Policy Program follows below (updated December 14, 2000):.. The US-Japan Foundation emphasizes research over dialogue.. Although the Foundation recognizes that frank and frequent dialogue among US-Japan policymakers and specialists is important for the bilateral relationship, we favor proposals containing a strong original research component.. Research has a broad meaning in this context.. It often includes a structured analysis of data or policies that yields a publishable result and makes a contribution to the body of evidence in support of viable solutions to problems of common US-Japan interest.. It could also include visiting fellowships in particular policy areas, study groups or other formats.. Collaboration between US and Japanese institutions is encouraged.. We look for lasting impact and practical relevance to US-Japan policymakers.. The Foundation favors projects that offer practical tools and information of lasting value to policymakers for current and emerging US-Japan-related issues.. There is an important balance to be struck between idealistic, long-term planning approaches and the development of practical, short-term policy recommendations.. 3.. We wish to encourage growth, education and interaction of younger scholars and policymakers in both countries.. The goals are to invest in  ...   and impartial structures for oversight and management of finance and trade, forums for conflict resolution, etc.. ) and more abstract (maintaining cultural and bio-diversity, just and fair agreements for such issues as resource extraction or regional pollution, and managing the clash of different value systems, etc.. ).. The US and Japan have a unique opportunity to be a strong positive influence regarding these issues.. Understanding Institutions.. - both in terms of multilateral (e.. WTO, APEC, ARF, etc.. ), bilateral (e.. US-Japan Common Agenda) and those within the US and Japan (e.. legislative, bureaucratic, non-governmental, etc.. Studies can be comparative and descriptive: to help each country understand the other and improve communication, trust and institutional cooperation.. The research can also be analytical with an eye toward institutional reform or institution building, but there must still be a clear link to the Foundations mission.. US-Japan Trade and Economic Relations.. - emphasis is on Japanese and Americans working together to understand and seek common solutions to potentially contentious issues (e.. trade imbalance, trade agreements, tax treaties, etc.. ) and develop policies for mutual and/or regional economic stability and improvement.. National Interest / Foreign Policy.. - topics include the US and Japan vis-à-vis the Korean Peninsula and/or China; regional security issues; Confidence Building Measures; controlling weapons proliferation; bilateral security arrangements and policies (with a particular emphasis on US military bases in Japan / Okinawa); managing environment-related threats or crisis; regional peacekeeping; and other related issues that can either threaten or help enhance regional peace and stability.. 6.. Notwithstanding point 5 above, the Foundation will seek out the best quality projects in service to the Foundations mission, regardless of issue area.. This Policy Program Description is not meant to be exhaustive or exclusionary.. The Foundation is always looking for unique approaches to improving the US-Japan relationship..

    Original link path: /usjapan_policy.html
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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
    Descriptive info: The Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award was approved by the Foundation's Board of Trustees in September 2001 and recognizes exceptional teachers who further mutual understanding between Americans and Japanese.. The award is presented annually to two pre-college teachers in two categories, humanities and Japanese language, and consists of a certificate of recognition, a $2,500 monetary award, and $5,000 in project funds.. It is named in honor of Elgin Heinz for his commitment to educating students about Asia as well as for the inspiration he has provided to the field of pre-college education.. Elgin Heinz.. Nomination Procedures.. Eligibility Requirements.. Deadline.. Review and Selection.. Selection Committee.. Contact Information.. 2002 Award Recipients.. 2003 Award Recipients.. 2004 Award Recipients.. 2005 Award Recipients.. 2006 Award Recipients.. 2007 Award Recipients.. 2008 Award Recipients.. 2009 Award Recipients.. 2010 Award Recipients.. 2011 Award Recipients.. 2012 Award Recipients.. Elgin Heinz (1913-2005).. A pioneer in educating American students about Asia, Elgin Heinz served throughout his life as a consultant on the development of materials and methods for teaching about this region of the world.. Born in China in 1913, Heinz attended the University of California at Berkeley, graduating with degrees in philosophy and public speaking and eventually earning a graduate degree in history from San Francisco State University.. He spent forty years teaching in San Francisco's Public Schools, at first teaching literature, and later, geography and history.. During his tenure as a teacher, Heinz became nationally known for his efforts in assisting students and teachers to learn more about Japan and Asia broadly.. In addition to classroom teaching, Heinz was active in a number of organizations, including the Association for Asian Studies, the Asia Society, the International Society for the Comparative Study of Civilizations, and the National Committee on U.. -China Relations.. He served as the Japan Society's Education Director in 1960.. Heinz has authored and edited numerous publications on teaching about Asia, including two widely used curriculum guides, Opening Doors and Stepping Stones.. Heinz has been the recipient of many awards including the National Council for Geographic Education's California Teacher of the Year and, in 1997, the World Affairs Council of Northern California's Castile Award.. Perhaps the award that most epitomizes his groundbreaking work in K-12 Asian Studies was the Association for Asian Studies Committee on Teaching About Asia's 1987 recognition of Elgin Heinz for Fifty Years of Innovative Teaching About Asia.. *.. (*Biographical information regarding Elgin Heinz and photograph were taken from the Fall 2000 issue of Education About Asia and were reprinted with permission from the Association for Asian Studies.. The award is open to current full-time K-12 classroom teachers of any relevant subject in the United States.. There are two award categories, one in the humanities and one in Japanese language.. Previous award recipients often have over 10 years of teaching experience and have been engaged in teaching their students about Japan for a substantial period of time.. Candidates must demonstrate sustained commitment to improving mutual understanding between Americans and Japanese, and must have made a significant contribution to enhancing  ...   which you are applying: Japanese Language or Humanities.. E) The subjects and grades you currently teach.. F) A list of Japan-related programs in which you have participated.. G) Names and contact information for those submitting letters of support.. A narrative (not to exceed three (3) pages typed, double spaced) describing your efforts to further mutual understanding between Americans and Japanese through your classroom teaching.. Applicants should also highlight leadership positions held and detail how they have impacted other educators locally and/or nationally.. A two-page project proposal describing how you would use the award's $5,000 project funds to enhance understanding of Japan at your school or in your school district (project funds are typically awarded to the awardees' school and, since these funds are awarded as a grant, the Foundation reserves the right to amend this portion of the application).. For example, such funds could be used to purchase curriculum material on Japan, for field trips to Japan-related organizations, to bring in guest speakers on Japan, for Japanese software, etc.. Three letters of support from individuals or organizations familiar with you and your teaching on Japan.. A letter from a student explaining how your efforts affected his/her perceptions and understanding of Japan is permissible as a letter of support.. One letter must come from the school's principal or vice principal and must express support for your project proposal in addition to supporting your candidacy for the award.. Support letters can be sent under separate cover or included with all applicatilon materials.. A professional resume.. The application should be submitted in hard copy to the Foundation at the following address:.. David P.. Janes.. Director of Foundation Grants and Assistant to the President.. United States-Japan Foundation.. 145 E 32nd Street, 12th Floor.. Tel: (212) 481-8757.. Note: no electronic documents will be accepted.. Deadline for 2013.. Complete applications must be received by the Foundation on or prior to February 1, 2013 to be considered for the 2013 award.. A national selection committee will review complete applications received by or on February 1, 2013.. The selection committee consists of leaders in the field of education about Japan.. The award winners will be announced in May.. Selection Committee.. Ms.. Patience Berkman.. Chair, History Department, Newton Country Day School of the Sacred Heart.. 2002 Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award Recipient.. Leslie Okada Birkland.. Japanese Language Consultant, American School in Japan.. 2005 Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award Recipient.. Lucien Ellington.. Editor, Education About Asia.. Christopher Livaccari.. Associate Director, Education and Chinese Language Initiatives.. Asia Society.. Margaret Lonzetta.. Vice President, World Affairs Council of Philadelphia.. Mari Maruyama.. Director of Curricula and Training, The Laurasian Institution.. Norman Masuda.. Instructional Supervisor of World Languages, Palo Alto High School.. Gary Mukai.. Director, Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education.. Lynn Parisi.. Director, Program for Teaching East Asia.. University of Colorado at Boulder.. Michael Rubin.. Former Director, NYC Public Schools Japanese Language Program.. 32nd Street, 12th Floor.. Questions about the Award should be directed to David Janes, Director of Foundation Grants at.. (212) 481-8757 or via e-mail at..

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  • Title: United States-Japan Foundation
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