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    Archived pages: 8 . Archive date: 2013-08.

  • Title: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)
    Descriptive info: .. Our Mission.. The mission of the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association is to promote, protect, preserve, enhance and support the office of Sheriff as conservator of the peace in providing public safety services to the citizens of Oregon.. What Oregon Sheriffs Do:.. Respond to citizens in need.. Enforce Oregon's laws.. Operate County Jails.. Process, Serve and Enforce Judicial Civil Notice and Orders.. Investigate Crime.. Manage 18 of Oregon's Parole and Probation Offices.. Provide Search and Rescue Services.. Provide Court Security.. Administer Oregon Concealed Handgun Licensing Program.. Join your Sheriff.. in the fight against crime.. by becoming an OSSA member today.. OSSA s Financial Reports are available for review upon contacting OSSA at 503-364-4204.. Message from OSSA President,.. Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers.. In 1843, while the early settlers of the Oregon Territory were still in the process of establishing a provisional form of government, it was apparent to them that they needed a trusted individual to provide leadership, accountability and a sense of safety and security to their community.. Joseph Meek, a local fur trapper known for his courage, sense of humor and commitment to helping others, fit this description.. The settlers elected him to the position of the first Sheriff of the Oregon Territory.. Countless stories have been told of how Sheriff Meek, guided by his strong sense of justice, made the fledgling  ...   a disaster strike your home, neighborhood, or county.. Please take the time to be prepared should the unimaginable occur put together a disaster supply kit and develop, review, and practice your family s disaster plan.. Feature Sheriff.. Sheriff Jim Hensley, Crook County.. In August 1981, Jim Hensley became a Reserve Police Officer with the City of Prineville Police Department and the Crook County Sheriff s Office.. Less than two years later in January 1983 he was hired on as a full-time police officer by then Chief of Police Jim Soules.. This filled a life-long ambition of his to be a police officer.. Jim s uncle, Dan Hargis, was a police officer in Antioch, California when Jim was in grade school.. Jim says he remembers listening to his Uncle Dan s stories and knew that was the career that he was destined for.. Jim s father was a captain with Los Angeles Fire Department; however, Jim knew law enforcement was the career for him.. Little did Jim know at that time that many years later he would be elected to the Office of Sheriff.. Donations to OSSA.. a 501(c)(3) organization,.. are tax-deductible.. OSSA never conducts telephone membership or donation solicitation.. Featured Articles & Information:.. Oregon Sheriff Marine Programs.. 2013 OSSA Annual Conference:.. Exhibitor Information.. OSSA.. Founded in 1916 to give.. Sheriffs a single, effective voice..

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  • Title: Membership: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)
    Descriptive info: Membership - How to Join.. Individual and Business Membership Programs.. Individuals and Businesses who want to support public safety across the State of Oregon may join the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA), a tax-exempt non-profit organization.. Your tax deductible dues and contributions support Oregon's 36 elected Sheriffs and their staff strive to improve citizen and community safety on a daily basis.. Oregon's Sheriffs are committed to the work of OSSA and strive to enhance criminal justice professionalism, improve law enforcement techniques and technology, and endeavor to collaboratively enhance community safety with their local, state and federal law enforcement partner.. click to enlarge.. Oregon Sheriff.. -  ...   all gifts are tax deductible.. You'll also receive special membership benefits including a quarterly publication of.. , which will keep you up-to-date with Sheriffs' Office around the state and current public safety issues.. Oregon's Sheriffs rely on your support!.. Fill in our.. Online Application.. Today!.. HONORARY INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP - Annual Dues $30.. Benefits Include:.. Annual Membership.. Membership Card.. Two Window Decals.. One-year subscription to quarterly magazine,.. HONORARY BUSINESS MEMBERSHIP - Annual Dues $50.. Business Window Decal.. Business Member Plaque.. OFFICIAL SPONSOR MEMBERSHIP - Annual Dues $100.. Official Sponsor Window Decal.. Name(s) listed in their County's "News around the State" section of.. One-year subscription to quarterly publication,..

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  • Title: OSSA President's Message: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)
    Descriptive info: President's Message.. Jason Myers, OSSA President Marion County Sheriff.. The Value of Your Sheriff s Office.. Fast forward 170 years to present day.. Oregon now has 36 counties with 36 independently elected sheriffs, each serving their own unique community.. While certain aspects of the Office of Sheriff have changed over time, one constant remains: Your elected sheriff works for the people and is committed to the priority of protecting the people, property and economy of their county.. Citizens are often surprised to learn that Oregon law designates specific public safety responsibilities as shall be the duty of the Like many of you, I ve been riveted to the television watching the coverage of the recent storms in the Midwest and East.. Sheriff.. Many of these requirements are only performed by the Sheriff and not by municipal or state law enforcement.. Each elected sheriff accomplishes their mandated functions through a variety of channels.. At the core, a sheriff provides leadership and direction to very dedicated and committed employees who deliver public safety services in their respective county.. These services  ...   collaboratively with other locally elected and appointed officials, to ensure public safety policy reflects the desires and needs of their constituency.. And at the state level, Oregon s 36 sheriffs combine efforts through the Oregon State Sheriffs Association to advocate at the legislative level ensuring that our state lawmakers create and maintain strong public safety policy.. Over time, the Office of Sheriff has clearly demonstrated that it enhances community livability and is vital to every Oregon citizen.. Unfortunately, the Office of Sheriff is at risk in certain parts of our state, as a number of counties are in financial distress.. The affects of reduced budgets has resulted in catastrophic reductions to several Sheriff s Offices.. This is of serious concern to every sheriff in our state.. Your Oregon Sheriffs are working diligently to find ways to restore stability in these very fragile economies.. As Sheriff s, we ask for your support in our efforts to achieve our top priority of protecting people, property and the economy of our counties.. The responsibility for safe communities belongs to us all..

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  • Title: Holly Russell, OSSA Executive Director: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)
    Descriptive info: Executive Director's Message.. Retired OSSA Executive Director, Holly Russell.. This is my final message as the Association s Executive Director.. While I will miss interacting with Oregon s sheriffs and OSSA s honorary members, I look forward to enjoying retirement and the opportunity to once again live in Central Oregon.. Working with Oregon s sheriffs, and their staff, has been a rewarding and educational experience.. While I spent 27-years working for a Sheriff s Office, I truly had no idea of the breadth of the responsibilities each elected Sheriff has until serving as the Executive Director.. Individually, and through OSSA, your sheriffs work diligently, and collaboratively with their local, state and  ...   citizens, serve their communities, and ensure that your public safety is a priority at all levels of government.. When you have the opportunity, please thank the dedicated men and women working in your local Sheriff s Office for their service.. They truly are deserving!.. I d be remiss if I didn t express my appreciation to Debbie Heinonen, Vicky Knutson and Debbie Spinden for their valuable contribution to the success of OSSA and for being such wonderful co-workers.. I d also like to one last time thank each OSSA individual and business honorary member and official sponsor for their support of OSSA the Association s work could not be done without you..

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  • Title: Sheriff Jim Hensley, Crook County: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)
    Descriptive info: Featured Sheriff.. In August 1986, Jim Hensley was hired into the Crook County Sheriff s Office by Acting-Sheriff Howard Becker.. Over the next 25 years, Jim worked practically every position that was available in the Sheriff s Office.. During the years that he was employed as a deputy sheriff, Jim was one of the original four members of the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team and received the Oregon Narcotics Enforcement Association s Officer of the Year award in 1994.. Jim was promoted to Sergeant in 1995 and served in this position for five years until being appointed Undersheriff in the year 2000.. Jim served as second-in-command of the Sheriff s Office for about eight years.. In 2009, Jim had the opportunity to expand his knowledge of the Sheriff s Office and took a position in the Community Corrections Office as a Probation Officer.. During his tenure as a probation officer, Jim was able to get a different perspective of what probation officers face in their daily contacts with parolees and probationers.. Jim says he feels that working as a probation officer gave him insight into the bigger picture of public safety and the overall operation of the Sheriff s Office.. Jim realized that every division of the Sheriff s Office has to be included in the function of the entire agency as we are all part of the team.. Jim said that having spent all these past years in the Sheriff s Office, that his goal has always been to one day be the Sheriff.. On November 2, 2010, that goal became a reality when Jim Hensley won the election for the Office of Sheriff in Crook County.. On January 3rd, 2011, Sheriff Jim Hensley was sworn into office as the 27th Sheriff in the history of Crook County.. He received the Oath of Office from his long-time friend and retired Circuit Court Judge, Gary Thompson, of the 22nd Judicial District.. Sheriff Hensley is 2½ years into his first term as Sheriff.. He said the biggest challenge so far has been dealing with personnel issues, as well as budget issues, when the economy is suffering in rural counties.. Another big issue is the lack of adequate jail beds.. There are not enough jail beds available to keep up with needs of the County.. Due to the inadequacy of the Crook County Jail, a matrix system is relied upon very heavily and Sheriff Hensley directed the Jail Commander, Lt.. Al Bond, to institute a waiting list for those waiting to serve their Courtordered sentence.. In order to mitigate some of the impact of these issues, Sheriff Hensley meets regularly with his management team to discuss personnel issues as well as budget issues.. In regard to these issues, Sheriff Hensley s philosophy is to deal with them directly and hold people accountable for their actions.. He is fair and consistent with all employees and supervisors alike.. All employees of the Sheriff s Office are very dedicated to Sheriff Hensley.. When budget cuts caused the loss of two positions in 2011, everyone stepped up and took on more duties to cover the loss of those positions.. In trying to overcoming issues in regard to the jail, Sheriff Hensley is constantly working with the County Commissioners and other community partners to come up with options for  ...   on the ground in the area.. It was reported the child was only wearing a diaper when the child went missing.. Fearing the worst, every available deputy responded to the area.. Sheriff Hensley was one of the first on-scene and started driving the roads in the area.. Sheriff Hensley was flagged down by a citizen and was led to the child.. He was alive and cold.. Sheriff Hensley wrapped the child in his duty coat to keep him warm until other help arrived.. Sheriff Hensley said, This is what law enforcement is all about.. There are not words to adequately describe the emotions you feel in those situations; anger, fear, frustration, relief, and satisfaction.. All of these run together and in the end, you are happy for the outcome.. It gives you a sense of accomplishment and that you made a difference today.. In regard to changes that he would like to see in the criminal justice system, Sheriff Hensley says he would like to see the system having a better way to get crime victims restitution.. When on probation, probationers don t always pay restitution to their victims.. Sheriff Hensley would like to see some process in which the probationer was required to work and repay the victims of their crimes.. During Sheriff Hensley s career in law enforcement he has seen many changes in this profession.. Some of the changes that affect the day-to-day operations are that calls for service have skyrocketed.. To help keep up with that increase, technology has improved immensely over the years.. When I started my career, cell phones were not in existence and the idea of having a computer in your car was unheard of.. We used typewriters in those days, or we wrote reports by hand.. Nowadays reports are dictated and someone else types them.. Sheriff Hensley says that he sees challenges for the future of the Office of the Sheriff.. The one main challenge is the loss of timber funds for timber counties and the other counties are going to face serious funding issues as well.. Sheriff Hensley also sees the Office of Sheriff coming under fire as Sheriffs stand up for the rights of their citizens as they fight to protect and uphold their rights under the Constitution.. When asked what he would change if he could, Sheriff Hensley said that in regard to his office, he would not change a thing.. He said that he is honored to serve the citizens of Crook County who put their trust and faith in him by electing him to the Office of Sheriff.. Sheriff Hensley said, I am blessed to have a wonderful, professional, and dedicated staff representing me in the community.. In a small agency like the Crook County Sheriff s Office, we are very close.. You get to know everyone here on a personal level.. You know their family as well.. You suffer through the bad times and rejoice with them in the good.. We are a family here and that is why I would not change a thing.. I am honored and delighted to be the Sheriff of such a great organization.. Sheriff Hensley and his wife, Sherrie, live in Prineville where they enjoy all that Crook County has to offer.. Written by Undersheriff John Gautney, Crook County Sheriff s Office..

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  • Title: OSSA Article: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)
    Descriptive info: Oregon is host to diverse, beautiful and sometimes dangerous waters that stretch from the crest of the Cascades to the deserts of eastern Oregon, the lush valleys of western Oregon and the coastal region.. Boating is fabulous in every season, but spring and summer are exceptional!.. The Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB) was established in 1959.. The Board is Oregon s recreational boating agency, dedicated to safety, education and access in an enhanced environment.. The Marine Board returns user fees (marine fuel tax and title and registration fees) to boaters in the form of boating safety educational programs, marine law enforcement and improved boating facilities.. The Board titles and registers recreational vessels, which currently number more than 195,000.. The Board also registers outfitters and guides and licenses ocean charter boats.. The Board provides technical training to marine patrol officers and supplies their equipment.. The board also provides grants and engineering services to local governments (cities, counties, park districts, and port districts) to develop and maintain accessible boating facilities and protect water quality.. The Board actively promotes safe and sustainable boating through several programs.. The Mandatory Boater Education program, when fully phased in, will require powerboat operators to complete a boating safety course.. Sustainable boating campaigns encourage boaters to upgrade to clean-burning marine engines, adopt cleanboating practices and avoid spreading aquatic nuisance species.. The board also provides numerous safety publications and access information.. The OSMB contracts with 31 county Sheriff s Offices and the Oregon State Police for marine patrol services in Oregon.. Law enforcement deputies are on the water to ensure your safety and make sure you are complying with waterway rules and regulations.. All marine deputies are specially trained in boat operation and have the authority to stop and board boats operating on state waters.. Boaters committing such violations as excessive speed and wake, boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII) and unsafe/reckless operation will draw the attention of law enforcement and are likely to receive citations.. Some situations may require arrest and police custody.. The deputies conduct regular vessel safety checks to ensure that every boat has all the necessary safety equipment on board.. All boaters operating a vessel equipped with a motor larger than 10hp are now required to have a boater s education card.. This course was designed by the Oregon State Marine Board to help boaters learn the rules and make them safer when on the water.. The following highlights some of the Oregon Sheriff s marine programs throughout the State.. If your county is not mentioned, they will be featured in the fall issue of this magazine.. Baker County Sheriff s Marine Program.. The Snake River Reservoirs, located in Baker County on the Border with Idaho, provide one of the largest warm water fisheries in Oregon.. There are numerous fishermen from all of Oregon and Washington State who come here to fish during the summer months.. There are also people who use the river during the winter months as well to access remote chucker hunting areas as well as fish during the winter months unless the river becomes froze over.. Baker County has one full time Marine deputy and two seasonal.. The Marine Deputies also patrol four inland lakes during the summer months.. Baker County has three boats to provide this service; two are equipped with jet pumps and one smaller prop boat.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $61,129 which is up 6% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 1,266 boater registrations, 23 citations issued and one boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 1,321 boater registrations, two citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests.. There were no reported accidents in 2012.. Benton County Sheriff s Marine Program.. Benton County s Marine Program has venue in five counties (Benton, Lane, Linn, Marion and Polk) upon the Willamette, Santiam, Long Tom and Alsea Rivers.. The patrol is conducted primarily on the Willamette River from Harrisburg downstream to Buena Vista in Marion County.. The Marine Patrol program in Benton County is a part time program, usually running from mid-May through the end of September.. Generally the patrol is staffed with temporary hire deputies, two of which work 40 hours per week (Friday through Monday) and two of which work 20 hours per week (Saturday and Sunday).. In addition to the two jet boats used by the deputies, Benton County also contracts with Yamaha to utilize two Waverunners as added resources.. Because of the nature of the Willamette River, the river is used primarily by kayak and canoe enthusiasts.. While there are still a number of recreational users, the focus is on promoting boating safety.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $63,543 which is down 3% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 2800 boater registrations, eight citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 2,874 boater registrations, 16 citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests.. There were two reported accidents in 2012 resulting in three injuries and vessel damage.. Crook County Sheriff s Marine Program.. The Crook County Sheriff s Office has an award winning marine patrol program supervised by a sergeant who staffs five seasonal marine deputies.. They have the responsibility for patrolling Prineville Reservoir, Ochoco Lake, Walton Lake and Antelope Flat Reservoir.. Crook County has not experienced a water related death since 2005.. In 2012, the marine patrol made over 2,200 boater contacts.. It conducted 963 boat equipment safety inspections and boat hull identification number inspections.. Crook County has seen a continued drop in operating revenue from the Marine Board since 2008.. We currently receive about $15,000 dollars less than we did five years ago.. Since that time we have eliminated one seasonal position and restructured our enforcement time to help make up the difference.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $101,871 which is down 8% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 1,501 boater registrations, 15 citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 1,609 boater registrations, 52 citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests.. There was one reported accident in 2012 resulting in vessel damage.. Curry County Sheriff s Marine Program.. Curry County s Marine Program is a full-time program with two full-time officers patrolling the Rogue River 52 miles upstream from the mouth to Blossom Bar, which is a class IV rapid.. Also patrolled is the Chetco River in Brookings up approximately 20 miles, along with the Elk and Sixes Rivers.. In addition to the rapid at Blossom Bar, the Rogue River has several class III rapids.. Many lives have been claimed at Blossom Bar.. Most of the funding comes from the Oregon State Marine Board from boater registration fees as well as the Coast Guard.. With declining boater registrations, budgets have also been impacted in recent years making it difficult to keep up the current level of services provided to our boaters.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $186,590 which is down 3% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 1,989 boater registrations, four citations issued and one boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 2,146 boater registrations, five citations issued and one boating under the influence arrests.. There were four reported accidents in 2012 resulting in three deaths, 1 injured,  ...   In 2012, there were 541 boater registrations, seven citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 563 boater registrations, one citation issued and no boating under the influence arrests.. Multnomah County Sheriff s Marine Program.. The Multnomah County Sheriff s Office River Patrol is responsible for patrolling over 98 miles of waterway that include the Columbia and Willamette Rivers, the lower portion of the Sandy River and the Multnomah Channel along Highway 30 to the Columbia County line.. The River Patrol Unit is a year around patrol function that provides police services on the water, manned by a total of 12 staff members.. They include eight deputies, two sergeants, a managing lieutenant and a full-time marine technician responsible for maintenance and repair of the office fleet.. The River Patrol fleet is designed to provide deputies with options to handle all types of waters in any weather condition and includes everything from two, 32-foot MaxCat catamaran boats to several kayaks designed for navigating shallow waters like the Columbia Slough.. The Sheriff s Office also has a Dive Team and Swift Water Team that works closely with the River Patrol and the Sheriff s Office Search and Rescue Unit.. Many of the deputies are crossed trained on several of these rescue functions.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $741,842 which is up 5% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 20,237 boater registrations, 250 citations issued and one boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 21,525 boater registrations, 749 citations issued and eight boating under the influence arrests.. There were 12 reported accidents in 2012 resulting in three deaths, 5 injuries and vessel damage.. Polk County Sheriff s Marine Program.. The Polk County Marine Program is a seasonal program that runs daily patrols from Memorial Day weekend through September.. We patrol approximately 40 miles of the Willamette River roughly from the confluence of the Santiam/Willamette Rivers to the Wheatland Ferry.. Since 2001, Polk County has been selected five times by the Oregon State Marine Board as the Seasonal Program of the Year.. We currently have in our marine fleet a 2001 North River Jet boat, 1995 Zillinger Jet boat, 1994 JetCraft Jet boat and two 2011 Yamaha Jet Skis.. Our program is funded by the OSMB but with recent cuts, we have had to trim our schedule down approximately 5 patrol weeks and may be looking at further reductions this next year to our patrol shifts during the week and possibly reducing shifts on weekends.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $75,023 which is down 3% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 1,889 boater registrations, 74 citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 2,013 boater registrations, 42 citations issued and four boating under the influence arrests.. There were two reported accidents in 2012 resulting in one death and vessel damage.. Union County Sheriff s Marine Program.. Union County s Marine Program provides law enforcement services to the boating community on both the water and the shores of seven waterways: Grande Ronde Lake, Jubilee Lake, Morgan Lake, Mud Lake, Wolf Creek Reservoir, Pilcher Creek Reservoir, and Thief Valley Reservoir.. In addition to the usual patrol duties, our marine deputy conducts hull inspections as needed or requested, and has been an important part of various safety fairs.. Additionally, he has been trained in detecting and preventing the intrusion of invasive species.. The high visibility and proactive approach of our program has contributed significantly to the very low number of waterborne accidents on the lakes, and only one drowning fatality in fifteen years.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $10,796 which is up 5% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 1,311 boater registrations, two citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 1,432 boater registrations, six citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests.. Wasco County Sheriff s Marine Program.. The Wasco County Sheriff s Office provides law enforcement marine patrols for all bodies of water located within the county.. These waterways include: Frog Lake, Clear Lake, Rock Creek Reservoir, Pine Hollow Reservoir, Taylor Lake, Columbia River and the Deschutes River.. Currently the Sheriff s Office has one full time marine deputy and another part-time marine deputy on rotation.. The Sheriff s Office uses two primary jet boats to patrol the named waterways.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $52,250 which is down 4% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 1,269 boater registrations, 41 citations issued and three boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 1,361 boater registrations, 46 citations issued and one boating under the influence arrests.. Washington County Sheriff s Marine Program.. The Washington County Marine Program is a seasonal program that is staffed by two fulltime deputies and two explorers, hired seasonally as paid Marine Aides beginning around March 1st and ending near the end of September.. The day-to-day operation of the program is overseen by a Patrol Sergeant with overall oversight assigned to the Special Operations and Teams Lieutenant.. We have enforcement oversight of the Tualatin River, Barney Reservoir and Henry Hagg Lake, which includes the Scoggins Valley Dam located at the south end of the lake and patrols the county s waterways with two jet boats; a 22 Boulton and 19.. 5 North River.. The Marine Patrol spends the majority of the summer patrolling Henry Hagg Lake, but can be called upon to work or assist on any body of water.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $73,731 which is up 12% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 12,643 boater registrations, 48 citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 13,241 boater registrations, 18 citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests.. Yamhill County Sheriff s Marine Program.. The Yamhill County Marine Patrol has patrol responsibility on the Willamette River from the Polk County Line downstream to the end of the Newberg Pool at Willow Island near River Mile 32.. The contract includes the Yamhill River up to Lafayette Locks County Park and also overlaps with Clackamas County from Willamette Falls to the area of Champoeg State Park.. Rogers Landing has exceeded capacity resulting in overflow conditions and members of the public parking on surface streets above the landing.. In 2011, Chehalem Paddle Launch was added near Ash Island which is operated by the Chehalem Park and Recreation District (CPRD).. In the current fiscal year 2012-13, OSMB provided additional support to address potential conflicts and to allow for additional patrol time in the area between Rogers Landing and Weston Landing.. This support was intended as one time Special Emphasis funding to cover added costs of overtime, fuel and maintenance.. The Yamhill County Marine Program is staffed with four full-time seasonal marine deputies and four part-time seasonal marine deputies that patrol with two boats.. Marine Board funding for 2013 is $78,453 which is up 11% from 2009.. In 2012, there were 3,961 boater registrations, 27 citations issued and one boating under the influence arrests as compared to 2009 where there were 4,120 boater registrations, 57 citations issued and no boating under the influence arrests.. There were two reported accidents in 2012 resulting in two injuries and vessel damage..

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  • Title: Online Membership Application: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA)
    Descriptive info: Membership Application.. Become an Honorary Member and Support Your Sheriff!.. All membership contributions are tax deductible! See.. three membership programs.. and their benefits.. Name:.. Address 1:.. Address 2:.. City:.. State/Province:.. ZIP code:.. E-mail address:.. Evening phone number.. (with area code).. :.. Day phone number.. Membership Level:.. Select one.. $30.. 00 - Honorary Individual.. $50.. 00 - Honorary Business.. $100.. 00 - Official Sponsor.. Thank you!.. You will be directed to a payment page when you submit this form.. Support Oregon Sheriffs by joining the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association today!..

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  • Title: Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA) Sidebar
    Descriptive info: Featured Article:.. 2012 OSSA Annual Conference and Awards Banquet..

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