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    Archived pages: 145 . Archive date: 2013-05.

  • Title: Designing a Learning Community
    Descriptive info: .. Intro.. Handbook.. Search.. Return to Arts for All Homepage.. Designing a Learning Community: A Handbook for K-12 Professional Development Planners.. Synthesizing extensive research of arts education practice across the United States, this handbook is a guide to designing arts education professional development for K-12 classroom teachers and provides a searchable database of 50 arts learning communities.. Explore this interactive resource online or.. click here.. to download the full handbook.. How to Begin.. Start by orienting yourself.. What is an arts learning community? What are the Big Ideas guiding the field?.. Assess Your Need.. Take a moment to reflect.. Inquiry is at the heart of professional development.. Where are you  ...   chapters will serve your professional development goals and circumstances.. Then explore, reading some chapters and browsing others.. Take detours into the recommended tools, bibliographic sources, or model programs.. Search the Models.. Go deeper to explore how the characteristics, structures, findings and lessons from existing arts learning communities inform your professional development practice.. A Project Of:.. Los Angeles County Arts Commission.. San Francisco Arts Commission.. and.. Santa Clara County Office of Education.. To Learn More:.. Project Background.. Bibliography.. Research and Writing By:.. Dawn M.. Ellis.. Edited By:.. Linda Chiavaroli,.. Dir.. of Communications,.. TOOL RESOURCES.. Programs for Students.. |.. Programs for Educators.. Designing a Learning Community.. Funding.. Research Evaluation.. Models and Materials.. Attribution..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: 7 Chapters.. 1.. Inquire.. 2.. Plan.. 3.. Rally.. 4.. Deepen.. 5.. Connect.. 6.. Transform.. 7.. Sustain.. Handbook Guide.. How to Begin.. This handbook is divided into 7 chapters.. Each chapter includes a section on Lessons Learned, Promising Practices and Useful Tools.. The Your Turn section at the end of each chapter offers reflective questions to help you map your next steps.. Print an entire chapter by using the printer icon in the upper right corner.. Where you enter this resource depends on your own goals and circumstances.. (Visit.. to help define your goals.. ).. This quick guide will help you find your best entry point.. Inquire:.. How can systematic inquiry strengthen arts education professional development?.. When the educators and other members of your learning community ask questions and seek to improve their practice, they have more investment in finding out the answers.. When educators and administrators design professional development opportunities around such relevant questions, they encourage continuous improvement.. Inquiry sits at the heart of the deeper arts learning communities, offering renewal.. Plan:.. How can developing a vision and a plan help improve teaching in or through the arts?.. Planning offers an important opportunity to bring a learning community together to develop goals, objectives, and timelines and to  ...   place and partners on board, you may seek strategies for deepening existing professional development to support your teachers.. Perhaps you’re trying to combat arts specialist isolation.. Or, you aim to connect specialists and generalists teaching the arts across schools, disciplines, and various levels of standards implementation.. Connect:.. How can high quality professional development translate theory into classroom practice in authentic, meaningful ways?.. Professional development is only effective if teachers connect it back to their classroom.. What strategies can be a part of your professional development plan to help teachers bridge the gap between theory and practice?.. Transform:.. How can arts-based professional development be an integral part of education reform?.. Arts education professional development can be a catalyst for education reform.. It’s not just about helping teachers who teach the arts, but changing whole systems.. If you have education administrators, stakeholders, and partners prepared to commit to a sustained effort, this may be your entry point.. Sustain:.. How can the professional growth of an arts education community be supported over time?.. New challenges arise as a community evolves and expands.. How can the efforts be maintained over leadership, funding or policy shifts? How can the members of the community continue to be invested beyond the initial waves of interest?..

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  • Title: Models Search
    Descriptive info: Search Designing a Learning Community.. Gain useful insights from a range of arts learning communities.. Browse.. all 50 models, or limit your search by typing part of an organization’s name or by selecting one or more of the search criteria below.. Name:.. State:.. --- select ---.. Alabama.. Alaska.. Arizona.. Arkansas.. California.. Colorado.. Connecticut.. Delaware.. District of Columbia.. Florida.. Georgia.. Hawaii.. Idaho.. Illinois.. Indiana.. Iowa.. Kansas.. Kentucky.. Louisiana.. Maine.. Maryland.. Massachusetts.. Michigan.. Minnesota.. Mississippi..  ...   Ohio.. Oklahoma.. Oregon.. Pennsylvania.. Rhode Island.. South Carolina.. South Dakota.. Tennessee.. Texas.. Utah.. Vermont.. Virginia.. Washington.. West Virginia.. Wisconsin.. Wyoming.. Target Population:.. Artists.. Arts Administrators.. Arts Specialists.. Classroom Teachers.. Education Administrators.. Other Educators.. Other Population.. Parents.. Professional Developers.. Staff.. Students.. Teachers.. Teaching Artists.. Arts Discipline:.. Dance.. Interdisciplinary.. Interdisciplinary arts and other subjects.. Multidisciplinary.. Music.. Other Discipline.. Theatre/Drama.. Visual Arts.. Handbook Entry Point:.. Education Thread:.. Education Reform.. Capacity-Building.. Statewide.. Leadership.. Partnership.. Inclusion.. Network.. Evaluation..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: This handbook is both a guide and a reference resource for professional development planners for K-12 arts education.. It is based on extensive research of arts education practice across the United States.. The results of the research show that systemic, ongoing, collaborative approaches to professional development yield powerful impacts for students’ learning in the arts.. Moving away from the professional development model of “one-shot” workshops, this guide will support you in providing effective professional development through establishing, growing and sustaining an arts learning community.. What exactly is an arts learning community? In an arts learning community a group of people, who share common values and beliefs, come together to examine and improve educational practices supporting instruction in dance, music, theatre and visual arts.. High quality professional development among a group cultivates growth in ways individuals cannot do alone.. Through this learning community approach, you as the professional development planner, are not alone in the design and delivery of professional development.. Educators from within schools and individuals from across the community may all contribute to the inquiry and development of the arts learning community, leading to young people benefiting from learning experiences in and through the arts from a broad arts education workforce.. To begin, consider who shares your values and goals for high quality instructions and learning in the arts.. In building an arts learning community, consider:.. Aides and paraprofessionals.. Arts and cultural organization educators.. Arts educators (pre-K- 12) in and out of your system.. Arts teacher professional associations.. Classroom teachers.. Community members who know young people, particular cultures, and how to connect them.. District level arts, curriculum, and assessment specialists.. Entertainment and arts-related businesses.. Governmental agency personnel involved in arts, education or community development.. Higher education researchers and professors preparing upcoming teachers and artists.. Legislators and state officials.. Parents, parent associations, and families.. Philanthropic officers.. Principals and superintendents.. Retired arts teachers.. School board members.. Social services  ...   proficiency.. Teachers, partners and students understand what proficiency looks and feels like.. Encourage teachers to lead.. True professional growth is ongoing.. Provide opportunities for educators and their partners to ask questions about their practice, discover answers and resources, and apply what they learn to their teaching and leadership.. Empower educators to lead, organize, plan, communicate, advocate and shape policy.. Teacher-driven professional development taps educators to no longer be just “beneficiaries” as they co-construct systems that meet the needs of teachers and students.. Master teachers lead formal development, sometimes working in partnership with valued partners, and the community develops ways to assess the learning.. Tap arts processes.. Arts integration also works for adult learners.. Arts education professional development can tap arts processes that bring people together and build community.. The powerful content innate to arts learning can help people focus on each other, creating a productive adult learning environment.. Educators learn and use arts content to create a productive learning mindset.. Think systemically.. Plan to cultivate multiple levels of support with teachers, district and school administrators, elected officials, and state leadership.. Then, look externally for potent community allies.. Teachers benefit from advocates creating space, time, and incentives for them to risk changing their practice and trying new ways of teaching.. Consider whole school professional development for greater sustainability of a permissive, arts-infused learning community.. Continually adapt and improve.. Once you’ve built a structure and program, prepare to knock it down and build it all over again.. Structures are subject to what’s needed to adapt to changing student and educator needs.. Combine inquiry with leadership to support flexible structures and adult learning opportunities.. Continued adaptation helps the professional development remain relevant to the changing learning community.. With these big ideas from the field in mind, take some time to reflect on the arts education professional development needs in your school and district.. The.. section can help guide your thinking..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: Assess Your Need.. Take a moment to write and reflect on the following questions:.. What is the current state of arts education professional development in your school system? What classroom instruction is happening? What professional development is happening?.. Who are your current partners in supporting and delivering instruction in dance, music, theatre and visual arts?.. What school or district goals have been set for the coming  ...   What are some of the root issues underlying these challenges?.. What additional information or evidence is needed to better understand the needs of the community?.. What values around arts education does your community hold?.. If you could do one thing over the next year that would improve arts education professional development, what would that be?.. What knowledge, skills or resources do you need to move forward?..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: Background.. Los Angeles County Arts Commission (in partnership with the Los Angeles County Office of Education), the Santa Clara County Office of Education (having adopted the former Creative Education Program of Cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley) and the San Francisco Arts Commission are all involved in ambitious strategic initiatives to create systemic change and to restore dance, music, theatre and visual arts to all students attending public school in each respective community.. The common element of these initiatives is technical assistance provided to local school districts to help them build their capacity to provide district-wide sequential arts education through the development and adoption of a long-range budgeted plan for arts education.. A critical factor to the success of all districts in implementing sequential arts education is the ability to provide high-quality professional development in dance, music, theatre and visual arts to teachers throughout the district.. However, currently, there is no central compendium of information about models and best practices in professional development for arts education to guide these efforts.. The three partner organizations secured public and private support and hired Dawn M.. Ellis, a national consultant, to serve as lead researcher and author for a handbook designed to meet this need.. Ellis facilitated background research, conversations with advisors, and field interactions.. Designing the Arts Learning Community: a Handbook for K-12 Professional Development Planners provides school districts with access to  ...   Involves education reform that includes a strong arts component.. While broad, we do not suggest that this resource is all-inclusive.. It does not focus on higher education, written curricula available for teaching the arts in schools nor does it include many vibrant learning communities who could not respond within our timeline because they were simply too busy doing good work.. Rather, this publication offers insights into a larger arts learning community, with promising practices and reflective lessons on arts education professional development.. Continue the discussion of this learning community as you, your teachers, and their partners strengthen your collective capacities to help young people learn in or through the arts.. Advisory Committee.. Rachelle Axel, San Francisco Arts Commission.. Ayanna Hudson Higgins, Los Angeles County Arts Commission.. Aimée Ipson Pflederer, Santa Clara County Office of Education.. Dana Powell, Santa Clara County Office of Education.. Diane Watanabe, Los Angeles County Office of Education.. Research Team.. Ellis, primary investigator,.. with Sarah Jencks, Rachel Kallmyer, Marv Klassen-Landis, Johanna Misey Boyer, Elizabeth Purcell, Carl Ritger, and Daniel P.. Theron.. Website Development and Editing.. Linda Chiavaroli, Megan Kirkpatrick and Elisha Wilson Beach, Los Angeles County Arts Commission.. Microgroove.. Professional Development providers who are featured in the Models section of this website have the ability to update their profile at any time.. Please send an email requesting access to your profile to.. artsforall@arts.. lacounty.. gov..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: Dawn Ellis.. As President of Dawn M.. Ellis Associates, LLC, Ellis weaves the skills of researcher, consultant, and multidisciplinary artist to improve work for the public good, particularly around arts and culture, access, learning, and social justice.. Groups such as the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, National Endowment for the Arts, Arts Education Partnership, and VSA arts work with Ellis to facilitate leadership and learning communities.. The Ford Foundation turned to Ellis to research and jumpstart their first arts and education initiatives and are now leaders in arts integration connected to urban reform.. Ellis empowers states and their constituents (including Tennessee, Wyoming, Rhode Island, and Connecticut) to see and improve education systems.. Research publications include: For the Greater Good: A Framework for Advancing State Arts Education Partnerships (National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, 2003); Community Schools of the Arts: An Arts Education Resource for Your Community (Americans for the Arts, 2003); and A Broad Brush: Access and Arts Education Insights from School Districts (VSA arts, 2004).. In addition, Ellis served as the primary researcher for Gaining  ...   start Value Plus, an education reform initiative.. Current research projects include serving as a critical friend for the education and leadership work of Ford’s Theatre in Washington, DC and mentoring and providing evaluation assistance to partnership between Delaware Theatre Company and Ferris School for (Adjudicated) Boys.. As “reflector-in-residence”, Ellis facilitated the 2008 National Assembly of State Arts Agencies annual arts education professional development gathering and has begun work with a statewide arts education coalition in Alabama for 2009.. Artistically, Ellis is refining a new performance piece with poet/ researcher Marv Klassen-Landis inspired by their work with young people and sings symphonic works.. Ellis serves on the founding editorial board of The Teaching Artist Journal and the board of the Delaware Symphony Orchestra.. Recent service includes serving on the Delaware State Arts Council as Chairman of the Grants and Programs Committee and participation with an Aspen Institute think tank to envision a national music service initiative.. At home in Delaware, she leads an arts integrated life with husband John Novotny and their young twin boys, Miles and Theodore..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: Promising Practices.. Lessons Learned.. Useful Tools.. Your Turn.. Inquire.. Strategies From General Education.. How can systematic inquiry strengthen arts education professional development?.. Wonder about your work.. Ask the burning question.. It provides direction and focus.. By reflecting on what helps teachers and students learn and systematically seeking answers, you can improve the structure of your professional development.. Inquiry can help you plan the professional development framework.. You assess needs and find out more about teachers’ current capacities and interests while envisioning possibilities.. A culture of inquiry helps educators, their partners and supporters connect the dots among professional development, teacher growth, and student learning.. In inquiry-based learning communities, the boundaries blur between professional developer and educator as well as between teacher and student.. Everyone contributes to collective learning and improved education.. Teachers participating in professional development actively craft the learning community, the questions, and ultimately, help colleagues and students grow.. With ongoing professional development and  ...   stock.. “Did we or didn’t we?’.. Example:.. To what extent are students developing dance literacy from our classroom teachers’ arts integration?.. The inquiry cycle for educators.. Ask, explore, find out something, contemplate what you find, adapt accordingly and ask again.. When teachers pursue the answers to thoughtful questions about their practice and are ready to use what they find out, it’s sometimes called ‘action research.. ’ Questions could include, “How can I measure and improve student music skills when choral work takes place in groups?”.. The inquiry cycle for professional development designers.. Ask, apply answers to inform structure, implement, collect data, reflect, apply changes, and ask again.. When people planning professional development ask questions about the services and broader learning community, it may be called evaluation or research, depending on the question’s scope.. Questions could include, “How effective are we in delivering the services we intended?” And, “What differences has it made for students?”..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: Plan.. Building the Plan.. Developing a vision is professional development.. Think beyond what’s being done today.. From general education, researchers Hyde and Pink recommend a shift in the way we think about professional development.. In their cross-study analysis of the topic, they challenge us to stop thinking of professional development as a series of activities and consider it a consistent component of a cohesive plan for long-term change.. They challenge communities to commit to a long-term process, both to plan and to change.. Envisioning new possibilities can happen at any level.. Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education Director Arnold Aprill asserts, “The actual collaboration and co-planning between people of different expertises is a significant piece of the professional development.. ” Planning for stronger arts education can be done on a large scale where colleagues, communities, even states from across the country come together in framed discussions to articulate a shared vision.. Or, it can happen on a very small scale, as an educator-mentor pair or a study group of colleagues imagine change in  ...   learn and arrive at a particular philosophy.. If they adopt the approach, an important part of their understanding is comprehending the assumptions underlying that philosophy.. The time together, away from the regular day-to-day work, can help educators step back, think, learn and consider how these ideas merge with their own conceptions.. See.. HOT Schools.. When planning, bring together the people who care about and can be involved in change.. Educators involved in large scale planning efforts have the professional development opportunity to take charge of their learning.. If their input is included and honored, they can help structure learning plans and environments while also developing their own leadership skills.. Arts Education Collaborative.. Within your arts learning community, develop your shared vision and chart how to get there.. When figuring out your strategy, refer back to your vision.. Ask “What needs to happen to make this a reality?” Maximize group assets by jointly selecting areas to strengthen while being clear and upfront about your challenges.. Together, you can plan, implement, and revise your strategies..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: Lessons Learned.. Useful Tools.. Rally.. Partnerships.. Networks.. Cross-System Supports.. Technology.. Don’t go it alone.. People who teach and support the arts in schools and the community can fortify each other.. Allies can help educators improve their capacities to teach in and through the arts.. Whether within school, cross-community or around a region, meaningful collaboration with others can deepen professional development.. Partners can season the mix of relationships within schools and districts, providing additional content as well as pedagogical and political expertise.. Coalitions may change policies that individual entities cannot, creating more supportive systems for arts education learning and teacher professional development.. Good partnerships require persistence and patience.. Understanding and trust may take time to establish….. First-time partners may discover that they have only learned to work well by the time their initial joint venture is concluded.. The next time they build upon their shared experience and achieve more.. - Learning Partnerships, Arts Education Partnership (Dreeszen, Aprill, and Deasy).. Creating  ...   Linda Valli and David Cooper write, “Without structures to institutionalize change, innovations have nothing to sustain them beyond individual interest and commitment…without cultural and programmatic changes to bring about shared language and goals, simultaneous renewal will never occur.. ”.. Mobilize people to find solutions.. To help a coalition solve problems without clear cut answers and think in new ways, leaders have the opportunity to “mobilize adaptive work”, according to Ronald Heifitz, director of Harvard’s Leadership Education Project.. In this model, leaders don’t dictate solutions; members of the group must develop their own abilities to move towards workable solutions.. People can help mobilize others whether or not they have the formal authority of principals, superintendents and school boards.. Embrace the isolated educators.. Be careful of alienating school-based arts specialists, a focal resource when considering arts teaching capacity.. Too often they are left out of the developing arts learning community, yet, these educators have more arts content familiarity than any other educators..

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  • Title: Handbook
    Descriptive info: Promising Practices.. Your Turn.. Deepen.. Teacher's World.. Strategies.. General Education.. Empowered Teachers.. Students are expected to learn the arts as core subjects.. Yet, in the traditional school structure, art, music, dance, and theatre are often considered “specials.. ” This designation can segregate credentialed arts teachers from the general learning community.. General classroom teachers are often in charge of teaching music, dance, theatre and visual arts, but may have little experience or training in the arts.. How can a classroom teacher without a strong arts education background teach these  ...   to help.. To deliver professional development that speaks to teachers’ needs as well as those of their students, it is valuable to first consider the context for teaching in and through the arts.. Through that lens, strategies for professional development can be devised to best serve your teachers.. Literature on general education professional development is a rich resource for useful structural suggestions for deepening the quality of teacher learning.. It should also be remembered that teachers can be empowered to take the reins to create their own learning opportunities..

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  • Archived pages: 145