www.archive-org-2013.com » ORG » I » IAADP

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".

    Archived pages: 165 . Archive date: 2013-11.

  • Title: International Association of Assistance Dog Partners
    Descriptive info: .. International Association of.. Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP).. A non-profit, cross-disability organization representing people partnered with guide, hearing and service dogs.. Search for:.. Important Education Opportunity!.. IAADPs Premiere Webcast Series is available ON-DEMAND, Extended through October 2013.. Workshop # 1 Access to Hospitals & Other Healthcare Facilities.. Presenters: The US Dept.. of Justice and US Dept.. of Health & Human Services, Office of Civil Rights.. Workshop #2: Assessing Dogs for a Service Dog Career.. Presenter: Jeanne Hampl, R.. N.. with introduction by Joan Froling.. Click Here to visit IAADP's Conference Page for Details.. HAVE YOU SEEN?.. New Resource.. - Assistance Dog Loss support line.. read more.. !.. New ADA Service Animal Definition & Regulatory updates!.. Click here for new definitions and regulations.. View wonderful DVD on Guide, Hearing & Service Dog Task Training & Work by IAADP cofounders; short film titled "Partners in Independence.. ".. Click Here to read the article and see the short film.. IAADP'S MINIMUM TRAINING STANDARDS FOR PUBLIC ACCESS.. Click Here for a list of minimium training standards.. IAADP's publication,.. "Partners Forum,".. now online!.. Click Here for Recent Issues.. Membership Information & Application.. Click Here for information and an application for membership.. You can now enroll or renew membership online with a credit card.. instead of mailing in the application, if you prefer.. Click Here to enroll or renew online using a credit  ...   - Participate.. International Assistance Dog Week.. U.. S.. Airport Service Animal Relief Areas - 2011 Campaign.. Access Issues: Quarantine Policy Changes.. Disaster Relief, Preparedness for Assistance Dog Teams.. Assistance Dog TASKS for Physical & Psychiatric Disabilities.. Advocacy Issues.. Advocacy Effort - CADO.. Air Travel with an Assistance Dog.. Size v.. Air Travel Access re: DOT NPRM 2004-07.. ADA Service Animal Definition-2008 Proposal.. Around the World.. Assistance Dog Selection and Training Information.. Assistance Dog Partnership.. Access Issues: Workplace Access Cases.. Assistance Dogs At Work: Photo Gallery.. Assistance Dog Humor.. Assistance Dog Partner's Help Line -- Please Stop By!.. Information and Resources.. Who's Who in the Assistance Dog Community?.. Assistance Dog Laws and Legal Resources.. Partners Forum: Global Information Sharing and Advocacy Newsletter Archive.. Canine Corner: Links to WWW Dog Resources.. Disability Resources.. International Association of Assistance Dog Partners.. Editor / Information and Advocacy Center.. 38691 Filly Drive.. Sterling Heights, MI 48310.. Accessible to people with disabilities!.. The International Association of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP) is a 501 (c) (3) non profit, granted that status by the Internal Revenue Service IAADP Tax ID # EIN - 38-3205336.. IAADP is also registered with the State of Michigan, as a Non Profit Corporation with tax exempt status: ( Entity ID Number: 727912 ).. Financial information about the International Association of Assistance Dog Partners can be found at Guide Star.. Guide Star Profile..

    Original link path: /
    Open archive

  • Title: International Association of Assistance Dog Partners - Conference 2013 - Assistance Dogs at Work
    Descriptive info: IAADP Conference Information.. IAADP WORKSHOPS FROM 2013 WEBCAST.. In lieu of a traditional conference in 2013, IAADP embarked on a pioneering venture in cyberspace.. Our goal was to broaden the opportunity for over 3000 IAADP members and many others with a personal or professional interest in our workshops to benefit through online attendance.. We waived the Registration fee to ensure cost would not be an obstacle.. This exciting online Event first broadcast on July 20th attracted viewers from the USA, Canada, and as far away as New Zealand, Germany, Turkey, Israel, the Netherlamds and Spain.. We featured two workshops, each a bit over one hour in length with an introduction by IAADP.. Now available as separate workshops for on demand viewing!.. ( 1 ).. Access to Hospitals & Other Healthcare Facilities for Disabled Persons with Service Animals.. Presenters: Sally Conway, U.. Department of Justice, Deputy Chief of the Disability Rights Section & Eileen Hanrahan, J.. , the U.. S.. Department of Health and Human Services, Supervisory Civil Rights Analyst in the Office of Civil Rights.. ( 2 ).. Assessing Dogs for a Service Dog Career.. Jeanne Hampl, R.. , Executive Director of the Prison Pet Partnership Program, (service dog provider); after 1999, President, Assistance Dog Club of Puget Sound, trainer who holds weekly service dog training classes for owner trainers.. Instructions for "On Demand" viewing of Workshops.. VIDEO LINKS AND EMBEDDED PLAYBACK WINDOWS.. Both workshop videos are hosted on YouTube, with links and embedded video playback windows below.. Once the video begins playing, you can turn closed captioning on and off by clicking the button labeled "CC" appearing at the bottom right of the video playback windows on a toolbar.. (Note: the CC button may not appear in the embedded videos below until after the video starts playing).. A popup window may appear for additional closed caption settings.. You can view these videos full-screen by clicking on the full-screen icon "[ ]" at the bottom right of the same toolbar.. If you go to the YouTube site, there is also a feature to view the transcript of the videos by clicking on the transcript button below the video playback window.. The transcript button is an icon without a text label, the 4th link from the left, which appears after three labeled links: About, Share, and Add To.. Workshop #1: Access to Hospitals and Other Healthcare Facilities for Disabled Persons with Service Animals (Duration: 1 hour 19 minutes).. YouTube Web Link / URL:.. youtube.. com/embed/JUrqb9KwNNk.. Embedded Video:.. Workshop #2: Assessing Dogs for a Service Dog Career (Duration: 1 hour 19 minutes).. YouTube Web Link URL:.. com/embed/s1jwM98iWnsk.. Viewing the video content of this webcast will require the free Adobe Flash Player.. Viewing the audio content will also require the free Adobe Flash Player.. To TEST your web browser for the ability to display Adobe Flash Player content, choose one of the following:.. Click here for the instructions (PDF format handout) to test your web browser.. or,.. Click here to visit Adobe's website directly to test your web browser.. If the test tells you that you need to INSTALL the free Adobe Flash Player, simply choose one of the following:.. Click here for Step-by-Step Instructions (PDF format handout) to install the free Adobe Flash Player.. Click here to visit Adobe's website directly and download the installer.. The audio and video webcast content have been tested with several web browsers and computer operating systems, but with all the various versions we cannot guarantee compatibility but have tried to be as inclusive as possible.. Web browsers including but not limited to Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome and Safari were able to successfully play video and audio content in the tests.. Unfortunately, the AOL web browser had issues playing the audio-only webcast content.. If you discover that you have an AOL web browser or another web browser with compatibility issues, you may want to run or install a different web browser.. These links are provided for convenience but IAADP makes no guarantee of function, suitability, fitness of purpose, security, etc.. IAADP accepts no liability whatsoever.. Use at your own risk and expense.. Mozilla Firefox :.. mozilla.. org/en-US/.. Google Chrome :.. google.. com/chrome.. Microsoft Internet  ...   received from disabled persons and hospital administrators seeking guidance.. ( 2 ) ASSESSING DOGS FOR A SERVICE DOG CAREER.. Presenter: Jeanne Hampl R.. As the Executive Director of the Prison Pet Partnership Program, 1994-1998, Jeanne selected and supervised the training of service dog candidates by prison inmates, placing the successful dogs with disabled applicants.. She also shared her nonprofit program s pioneering work in identifying and training seizure alert dogs through Assistance Dogs International (ADI) conference workshops and through the media.. From 1999 - 2013, as the founder and current President of the Assistance Dog Club of Puget Sound, Jeanne has helped many disabled persons to find and train suitable candidates to become their assistance dog, holding weekly training classes for that purpose.. She is a longtime member of the National Association of Dog Obedience Instructors (NADOI).. WHO Can Benefit from this Workshop?.. The demand for highly trained service dogs from reputable nonprofit programs in North America continues to far exceed the supply available to the disabled community each year.. This leaves thousands of persons with a wide range of disabling conditions other than deafness or blindness who must look into other options in the attempt to make their dream of a service dog come true.. The same holds true for the disabled population in some other countries where a shortage of funding, service dog trainers and /or suitable dogs limit how many dogs can be trained and placed each year and given follow up support by existing assistance dog training programs.. IAADP believes everyone dedicated to fostering high behavioral and training standards for guide, hearing and service dogs and the responsible use of legal access rights is a stakeholder in the success of such individuals.. We would like to increase their chances of achieving a successful outcome.. This workshop is the latest addition to our educational outreach efforts.. Over the years IAADP has received a number of bitter consumer complaints from disabled persons and their families about a trainer or program that took advantage of their inexperience and desperation.. Some have been referred to IAADP by a guide dog school or a hearing dog or service dog program belonging to Assistance Dogs International (ADI) which was initially contacted by these consumers looking for training help to try to fix their dog s problems due the huge emotional and /or financial investment they have in that dog.. So one of IAADP s goals in holding this workshop is to educate disabled veterans, the parents of disabled children and many others seeking a service dog to try to help them become more savvy consumers and to be better able to recognize if a dog offered to them is suitable [ or NOT ] for this career and the particulars of their own situation.. Another important goal is to give a helping hand to those who may be considering the idea of owner-training a service dog for themselves or a disabled loved one.. What factors should you consider before acquiring a puppy or an adult dog from a shelter, rescue, breeder or trainer? What tests can be useful in assessing a dog s potential? If you already own a dog, how can you tell if this dog has the right traits needed for this challenging career?.. In keeping with IAADP s tradition of fostering the sharing of how to information between assistance dog partners and providers, this workshop also offers an opportunity to acquaint service dog trainers and nonprofit providers with some evaluation techniques that could be a valuable addition to their own assessment protocol.. Jean Hampl let us know she has set up an Email List for those who would like to have the opportunity for a Question & Answer discussion after her workshop.. So if you would like to have further information on this topic and /or an opportunity to share your own insights on assessing dogs for a service dog career to help fairly new providers, trainers and those considering the owner-trainer option, she will provide Sign up information to you at the end of her presentation.. If you have any questions, you are welcome to contact me, Joan Froling, at.. Joan@iaadp.. or at 586-826-3938.. Return to IAADP Home..

    Original link path: /conference.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP - ADLC
    Descriptive info: IAADP.. Assistance Dog Partners.. Assistance Dog Loss Committee - A New Resource.. Are you grieving the loss or impending retirement of your assistance dog?.. Would you like to participate in a monthly support group by phone with others in the same situation?.. An IAADP committee will start offering these phone calls in May.. IF YOU are interested, please email.. ADLC@iaadp..  ...   to see if the group is right for you.. Since the committee has no idea how many assistance dog partners may be interested in this service, the first ones who contact us through.. will be served first.. If you have been through the loss of an assistance dog and would like to consider helping the committee, please get in touch at..

    Original link path: /adlc.html
    Open archive

  • Title: International Association of Assistance Dog Partners
    Descriptive info: New ADA Service Animal Definition July 23, 2010.. Plus Modification in Policies, Practices or Procedures pertaining to Service Animals & Guidance on ADA Revisions.. Responses to Public Comments.. EXCITING NEWS.. The U.. Department of Justice (DOJ) has completed its update of the regulations that implement the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) after nearly a decade of review and two periods of soliciting public comments during the rule making process.. On July 23, 2010, the Attorney General of the United States released the Final Rule containing the new Service Animal Definition, other modifications on service animal policies and a section by section response by the DOJ to public comments, explaining its decisions, for both Title II and Title III of the ADA.. IAADP has published the new Service Animal Definition and other excerpts pertaining to service animals on this web page for quick reference and your reading convenience.. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.. 28 CFR Part 36.. CRT Docket No.. 106; AG Order No.. RIN 1190-AA44.. Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by Public Accommodations and in Commercial Facilities.. AGENCY:.. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division.. ACTION: FINAL RULE ADA Title III.. ADA Subpart A 36.. 104 Definitions.. Service animal.. means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition.. The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the handler´s disability.. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing non-violent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors.. The crime deterrent effects of an animal´s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of this definition.. ADA Subpart C 36.. 302 Final Rule Title III.. Subpart C Specific Requirements.. 1.. 5.. Amend § 36.. 302 as follows--.. a.. Revise paragraph (c)(2); and.. b.. Add paragraphs (c)(3) through (c)(9) and paragraphs (e) and (f) to read as follows--.. § 36.. 302 Modifications in policies, practices, or procedures.. (c) * * *.. (2).. Exceptions.. A public accommodation may ask an individual with a disability to remove a service animal from the premises if:.. (i) The animal is out of control and the animal´s handler does not take effective action to control it; or.. (ii) The animal is not housebroken.. (3).. If an animal is properly excluded.. If a public accommodation properly excludes a service animal under § 36.. 302(c)(2), it shall give the individual with a disability the opportunity to obtain goods, services, and accommodations without having the service animal on the premises.. (4).. Animal under handler s control.. A service animal shall be under the control of its handler.. A service animal shall have a harness, leash, or other tether, unless either the handler is unable because of a disability to use a harness, leash, or other tether, or the use of a harness, leash, or other tether would interfere with the service animal´s safe, effective performance of work or tasks, in which case the service animal must be otherwise under the handler´s control (e.. g.. , voice control, signals, or other effective means).. (5).. Care or supervision.. A public accommodation is not responsible for the care or supervision of a service animal.. (6).. Inquiries.. A public accommodation shall not ask about the nature or extent of a person´s disability, but may make two inquiries to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal.. A public accommodation may ask if the animal is required because of a disability and what work or task the animal has been trained to perform.. A public accommodation shall not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal.. Generally, a public accommodation may not make these inquiries about a service animal when it is readily apparent that an animal is trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability (e.. , the dog is observed guiding an individual who is blind or has low vision, pulling a person´s wheelchair, or providing assistance with stability or balance to an individual with an observable mobility disability).. (7).. Access to areas of a public accommodation.. Individuals with disabilities shall be permitted to be accompanied by their service animals in all areas of a place of public accommodation where members of the public, program participants, clients, customers, patrons, or invitees, as relevant, are allowed to go.. (8).. Surcharges.. A public accommodation shall not ask or require an individual with a disability to pay a surcharge, even if people accompanied by pets are required to pay fees, or to comply with other requirements generally not applicable to people without pets.. If a public accommodation normally charges individuals for the damage they cause, an individual with a disability may be charged for damage caused by his or her service animal.. (9).. Miniature horses.. (i) A public accommodation shall make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a miniature horse by an individual with a disability if the miniature horse has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of the individual with a disability.. (ii).. Assessment factors.. In determining whether reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures can be made to allow a miniature horse into a specific facility, a public accommodation shall consider--.. (A) The type, size, and weight of the miniature horse and whether the facility can accommodate these features;.. (B) Whether the handler has sufficient control of the miniature horse;.. (C) Whether the miniature horse is housebroken; and.. (D) Whether the miniature horse´s presence in a specific facility compromises legitimate safety requirements that are necessary for safe operation.. (iii).. Other requirements.. Sections 36.. 302(c)(3) through (c)(8), which apply to service animals, shall also apply to miniature horses.. * * * * *.. Appendix A to Part 36--Guidance on Revisions to ADA Regulation on Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by Public Accommodations and Commercial Facilities.. NOTE: This Appendix contains guidance providing a section-by-section analysis of the revisions to 28 CFR part 36 published on [INSERT PUBLICATION DATE OF FINAL RULE IN FEDERAL REGISTER].. SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS AND RESPONSE TO PUBLIC COMMENTS.. This section provides a detailed description of the Department´s changes to the title III regulation, the reasoning behind those changes, and responses to public comments received on these topics.. The Section-by-Section Analysis follows the order of the title III regulation itself, except that if the Department has not changed a regulatory section, the unchanged section has not been mentioned.. "Service Animal".. 2.. Section 36.. 104 of the 1991 title III regulation defines a "service animal" as "any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or fetching dropped items.. " Section 36.. 302(c)(1) of the 1991 title III regulation requires that "[g]enerally, a public accommodation shall modify policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a service animal by an individual with a disability.. 302(c)(2) of the 1991 title III regulation states that "a public accommodation [is not required] to supervise or care for a service animal.. ".. The Department has issued guidance and provided technical assistance and publications concerning service animals since the 1991 regulations became effective.. In the NPRM, the Department proposed to modify the definition of service animal and asked for public input on several issues related to the service animal provisions of the 1991 title III regulation: whether the Department should clarify the phrase "providing minimal protection" in the definition or remove it; whether there are any circumstances where a service animal "providing minimal protection" would be appropriate or expected; whether certain species should be eliminated from the definition of "service animal," and, if so, which types of animals should be excluded; whether "common domestic animal" should be part of the definition; and whether a size or weight limitation should be imposed for common domestic animals, even if the animal satisfies the "common domestic animal" part of the NPRM definition.. The Department received extensive comments on these issues, as well as requests to clarify the obligations of public accommodations to accommodate individuals with disabilities who use service animals, and has modified the final rule in response.. In the interests of avoiding unnecessary repetition, the Department has elected to discuss the issues raised in the NPRM questions about service animals and the corresponding public comments in the following discussion of the definition of "service animal.. The Department´s final rule defines "service animal" as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.. This definition has been designed to clarify a key provision of the ADA.. Many covered entities indicated that they are confused regarding their obligations under the ADA with regard to individuals with disabilities who use service animals.. Individuals with disabilities who use trained guide or service dogs are concerned that if untrained or unusual animals are termed "service animals," their own right to use guide or service dogs may become unnecessarily restricted or questioned.. Some individuals who are not individuals with disabilities have claimed, whether fraudulently or sincerely (albeit mistakenly), that their animals are service animals covered by the ADA, in order to gain access to hotels, restaurants, and other places of public accommodation.. The increasing use of wild, exotic, or unusual species, many of which are untrained, as service animals has also added to the confusion.. Finally, individuals with disabilities who have the legal right under the Fair Housing Act (FHAct) to use certain animals in their homes as a reasonable accommodation to their disabilities have assumed that their animals also qualify under the ADA.. This is not necessarily the case, as discussed below.. The Department recognizes the diverse needs and preferences of individuals with disabilities protected under the ADA, and does not wish to unnecessarily impede individual choice.. Service animals play an integral role in the lives of many individuals with disabilities, and with the clarification provided by the final rule, individuals with disabilities will continue to be able to use their service animals as they go about their daily activities.. The clarification will also help to ensure that the fraudulent or mistaken use of other animals not qualified as service animals under the ADA will be deterred.. A more detailed analysis of the elements of the definition and the comments responsive to the service animal provisions of the NPRM follows.. Providing minimal protection.. The 1991 title III regulation included language stating that "minimal protection" was a task that could be performed by an individually trained service animal for the benefit of an individual with a disability.. In the Department´s "ADA Business Brief on Service Animals" (2002), the Department interpreted the "minimal protection" language within the context of a seizure (i.. e.. , alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure).. The Department received many comments in response to the question of whether the "minimal protection" language should be clarified.. Many commenters urged the removal of the "minimal protection" language from the service animal definition for two reasons: (1) The phrase can be interpreted to allow any dog that is trained to be aggressive to qualify as a service animal simply by pairing the animal with a person with a disability; and (2) The phrase can be interpreted to allow any untrained pet dog to qualify as a service animal, since many consider the mere presence of a dog to be a crime deterrent, and thus sufficient to meet the minimal protection standard.. These commenters argued, and the Department agrees, that these interpretations were not contemplated under the original title III regulation.. While many commenters stated that they believe that the "minimal protection" language should be eliminated, other commenters recommended that the language be clarified, but retained.. Commenters favoring clarification of the term suggested that the Department explicitly exclude the function of attack or exclude those animals that are trained solely to be aggressive or protective.. Other commenters identified non-violent behavioral tasks that could be construed as minimally protective, such as interrupting self-mutilation, providing safety checks and room searches, reminding the handler to take medications, and protecting the handler from injury resulting from seizures or unconsciousness.. Several commenters noted that the existing direct threat defense, which allows the exclusion of a service animal if the animal exhibits unwarranted or unprovoked violent behavior or poses a direct threat, prevents the use of "attack dogs" as service animals.. One commenter noted that the use of a service animal trained to provide "minimal protection" may impede access to care in an emergency, for example, where the first responder is unable or reluctant to approach a person with a disability because the individual´s service animal is in a protective posture suggestive of aggression.. Many organizations and individuals stated that in the general dog training community, "protection" is code for attack or aggression training and should be removed from the definition.. Commenters stated that there appears to be a broadly held misconception that aggression-trained animals are appropriate service animals for persons with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).. While many individuals with PTSD may benefit by using a service animal, the work or tasks performed appropriately by such an animal would not involve unprovoked aggression but could include actively cuing the handler by nudging or pawing the handler to alert to the onset of an episode and removing the individual from the anxiety-provoking environment.. The Department recognizes that despite its best efforts to provide clarification, the "minimal protection" language appears to have been misinterpreted.. While the Department maintains that protection from danger is one of the key functions that service animals perform for the benefit of persons with disabilities, the Department recognizes that an animal individually trained to provide aggressive protection, such as an attack dog, is not appropriately considered a service animal.. Therefore, the Department has decided to modify the "minimal protection" language to read "non-violent protection," thereby excluding so-called "attack dogs" or dogs with traditional "protection training" as service animals.. The Department believes that this modification to the service animal definition will eliminate confusion, without restricting unnecessarily the type of work or tasks that service animals may perform.. The Department´s modification also clarifies that the crime-deterrent effect of a dog´s presence, by itself, does not qualify as work or tasks for purposes of the service animal definition.. Alerting to intruders.. The phrase "alerting to intruders" is related to the issues of minimal protection and the work or tasks an animal may perform to meet the definition of a service animal.. In the original 1991 regulatory text, this phrase was intended to identify service animals that alert individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of others.. This language has been misinterpreted by some to apply to dogs that are trained specifically to provide aggressive protection, resulting in the assertion that such training qualifies a dog as a service animal under the ADA.. The Department reiterates that public accommodations are not required to admit any animal whose use poses a direct threat.. In addition, the Department has decided to remove the word "intruders" from the service animal definition and replace it with the phrase "the presence of people or sounds.. " The Department believes this clarifies that so-called "attack training" or other aggressive response types of training that cause a dog to provide an aggressive response do not qualify a dog as a service animal under the ADA.. Conversely, if an individual uses a  ...   require larger dogs.. The Department believes it would be inappropriate to deprive these individuals of the option of using a service dog of the size required to provide the physical support and stability these individuals may need to function independently.. Since large dogs have always served as service animals, continuing their use should not constitute fundamental alterations or impose undue burdens on public accommodations.. Breed limitations:.. A few commenters suggested that certain breeds of dogs should not be allowed to be used as service animals.. Some suggested that the Department should defer to local laws restricting the breeds of dogs that individuals who reside in a community may own.. Other commenters opposed breed restrictions, stating that the breed of a dog does not determine its propensity for aggression and that aggressive and non-aggressive dogs exist in all breeds.. The Department does not believe that it is either appropriate or consistent with the ADA to defer to local laws that prohibit certain breeds of dogs based on local concerns that these breeds may have a history of unprovoked aggression or attacks.. Such deference would have the effect of limiting the rights of persons with disabilities under the ADA who use certain service animals based on where they live rather than on whether the use of a particular animal poses a direct threat to the health and safety of others.. Breed restrictions differ significantly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.. Some jurisdictions have no breed restrictions.. Others have restrictions that, while well-meaning, have the unintended effect of screening out the very breeds of dogs that have successfully served as service animals for decades without a history of the type of unprovoked aggression or attacks that would pose a direct threat, e.. , German Shepherds.. Other jurisdictions prohibit animals over a certain weight, thereby restricting breeds without invoking an express breed ban.. In addition, deference to breed restrictions contained in local laws would have the unacceptable consequence of restricting travel by an individual with a disability who uses a breed that is acceptable and poses no safety hazards in the individual´s home jurisdiction but is nonetheless banned by other jurisdictions.. Public accommodations have the ability to determine, on a case-by-case basis, whether a particular service animal can be excluded based on that particular animal´s actual behavior or history--not based on fears or generalizations about how an animal or breed might behave.. This ability to exclude an animal whose behavior or history evidences a direct threat is sufficient to protect health and safety.. Recognition of psychiatric service animals, but not emotional support animals.. The definition of "service animal" in the NPRM stated the Department´s longstanding position that emotional support animals are not included in the definition of "service animal.. " The proposed text provided that "[a]nimals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals.. " 73 FR 34508, 34553 (June 17, 2008).. Many advocacy organizations expressed concern and disagreed with the exclusion of comfort and emotional support animals.. Others have been more specific, stating that individuals with disabilities may need their emotional support animals in order to have equal access.. Some commenters noted that individuals with disabilities use animals that have not been trained to perform tasks directly related to their disability.. These animals do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.. These are emotional support or comfort animals.. Commenters asserted that excluding categories such as "comfort" and "emotional support" animals recognized by laws such as the FHAct or the ACAA is confusing and burdensome.. Other commenters noted that emotional support and comfort animals perform an important function, asserting that animal companionship helps individuals who experience depression resulting from multiple sclerosis.. Some commenters explained the benefits emotional support animals provide, including emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, and the promotion of emotional well-being.. They contended that without the presence of an emotional support animal in their lives they would be disadvantaged and unable to participate in society.. These commenters were concerned that excluding this category of animals will lead to discrimination against and excessive questioning of individuals with non-visible or non-apparent disabilities.. Other commenters expressing opposition to the exclusion of individually trained "comfort" or "emotional support" animals asserted that the ability to soothe or de-escalate and control emotion is "work" that benefits the individual with the disability.. Many commenters requested that the Department carve out an exception that permits current or former members of the military to use emotional support animals.. They asserted that a significant number of service members returning from active combat duty have adjustment difficulties due to combat, sexual assault, or other traumatic experiences while on active duty.. Commenters noted that some current or former members of the military service have been prescribed animals for conditions such as PTSD.. One commenter stated that service women who were sexually assaulted while in the military use emotional support animals to help them feel safe enough to step outside their homes.. The Department recognizes that many current and former members of the military have disabilities as a result of service-related injuries that may require emotional support and that such individuals can benefit from the use of an emotional support animal and could use such animal in their home under the FHAct.. However, having carefully weighed the issues, the Department believes that its final rule appropriately addresses the balance of issues and concerns of both the individual with a disability and the public accommodation.. The Department also notes that nothing in this part prohibits a public entity from allowing current or former military members or anyone else with disabilities to utilize emotional support animals if it wants to do so.. Commenters asserted the view that if an animal´s "mere presence" legitimately provides such benefits to an individual with a disability and if those benefits are necessary to provide equal opportunity given the facts of the particular disability, then such an animal should qualify as a "service animal.. " Commenters noted that the focus should be on the nature of a person´s disability, the difficulties the disability may impose and whether the requested accommodation would legitimately address those difficulties, not on evaluating the animal involved.. The Department understands this approach has benefitted many individuals under the FHAct and analogous State law provisions, where the presence of animals poses fewer health and safety issues and where emotional support animals provide assistance that is unique to residential settings.. The Department believes, however, that the presence of such animals is not required in the context of public accommodations, such as restaurants, hospitals, hotels, retail establishments, and assembly areas.. Under the Department´s previous regulatory framework, some individuals and entities assumed that the requirement that service animals must be individually trained to do work or perform tasks excluded all individuals with mental disabilities from having service animals.. Others assumed that any person with a psychiatric condition whose pet provided comfort to them was covered by the 1991 title III regulation.. The Department reiterates that psychiatric service animals that are trained to do work or perform a task for individuals whose disability is covered by the ADA are protected by the Department´s present regulatory approach.. Psychiatric service animals can be trained to perform a variety of tasks that assist individuals with disabilities to detect the onset of psychiatric episodes and ameliorate their effects.. Tasks performed by psychiatric service animals may include reminding the handler to take medicine, providing safety checks or room searches for persons with PTSD, interrupting self-mutilation, and removing disoriented individuals from dangerous situations.. The difference between an emotional support animal and a psychiatric service animal is the work or tasks that the animal performs.. Traditionally, service dogs worked as guides for individuals who were blind or had low vision.. Since the original regulation was promulgated, service animals have been trained to assist individuals with many different types of disabilities.. In the final rule, the Department has retained its position on the exclusion of emotional support animals from the definition of "service animal.. " The definition states that "[t]he provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship * * * do[es] not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of this definition.. " The Department notes, however, that the exclusion of emotional support animals from coverage in the final rule does not mean that individuals with psychiatric or mental disabilities cannot use service animals that meet the regulatory definition.. The final rule defines service animal as follows: "Service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.. " This language simply clarifies the Department´s longstanding position.. The Department´s position is based on the fact that the title II and title III regulations govern a wider range of public settings than the housing and transportation settings for which the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the DOT regulations allow emotional support animals or comfort animals.. The Department recognizes that there are situations not governed by the title II and title III regulations, particularly in the context of residential settings and transportation, where there may be a legal obligation to permit the use of animals that do not qualify as service animals under the ADA, but whose presence nonetheless provides necessary emotional support to persons with disabilities.. Accordingly, other Federal agency regulations, case law, and possibly State or local laws governing those situations may provide appropriately for increased access for animals other than service animals as defined under the ADA.. Public officials, housing providers, and others who make decisions relating to animals in residential and transportation settings should consult the Federal, State, and local laws that apply in those areas (e.. , the FHAct regulations of HUD and the ACAA) and not rely on the ADA as a basis for reducing those obligations.. Retain term service animal.. Some commenters asserted that the term "assistance animal" is a term of art and should replace the term "service animal"; however, the majority of commenters preferred the term "service animal" because it is more specific.. The Department has decided to retain the term "service animal" in the final rule.. While some agencies, like HUD, use the terms "assistance animal," "assistive animal," or "support animal," these terms are used to denote a broader category of animals than is covered by the ADA.. The Department has decided that changing the term used in the final rule would create confusion, particularly in view of the broader parameters for coverage under the FHAct, cf.. Preamble to HUD´s Final Rule for Pet Ownership for the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities, 73 FR 63834 38 (Oct.. 27, 2008); HUD Handbook No.. 4350.. 3 Rev-1, Chapter 2,.. Occupancy Requirements of Subsidized Multifamily Housing Programs.. (June 2007), available at.. hud.. gov/offices/adm/hudclips/handbooks/hsgh/4350.. 3.. Moreover, as discussed above, the Department´s definition of "service animal" in the final rule does not affect the rights of individuals with disabilities who use assistance animals in their homes under the FHAct or who use "emotional support animals" that are covered under the ACAA and its implementing regulations.. See.. 14 CFR 382.. 7.. et seq.. ; see also.. Department of Transportation,.. Guidance Concerning Service Animals in Air Transportation,.. 68 FR 24874, 24877 (May 9, 2003) (discussing accommodation of service animals and emotional support animals on aircraft).. ADA Final Rule Title II July 23, 2010.. Title II of the ADA.. applies to state and local government entities.. The definition of a service animal and the modification section which discusses access for a disabled person with a miniature horse in Title II is identical to that which was published in Title III, so it will not be repeated here.. The Section by Section response to Public Comments in Appendix A to Title II begins with information specific to Title II, so that part will be included below.. Although there is no specific language in the 1991 title II regulation concerning service animals, title II entities have the same legal obligations as title III entities to make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures to allow service animals when necessary in order to avoid discrimination on the basis of disability, unless the entity can demonstrate that making the modifications would fundamentally alter the nature of the service, program, or activity.. 28 CFR 35.. 130(b)(7).. The 1991 title III regulation, 28 CFR 36.. 104, defines a "service animal" as "any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or fetching dropped items.. In the NPRM, the Department proposed to modify the definition of service animal, added the definition to title II, and asked for public input on several issues related to the service animal provisions of the title II regulation: whether the Department should clarify the phrase "providing minimal protection" in the definition or remove it; whether there are any circumstances where a service animal "providing minimal protection" would be appropriate or expected; whether certain species should be eliminated from the definition of "service animal," and, if so, which types of animals should be excluded; whether "common domestic animal" should be part of the definition; and whether a size or weight limitation should be imposed for common domestic animals even if the animal satisfies the "common domestic animal" part of the NPRM definition.. The Department received extensive comments on these issues, as well as requests to clarify the obligations of State and local government entities to accommodate individuals with disabilities who use service animals, and has modified the final rule in response.. NOTE from IAADP on rest of Appendix A of Title II:.. The remainder of this material, Appendix A to Title II, Section by Section Response to Public Comments regarding service animals, which pertains to state and local government entities, is essentially the same as the DOJ s response given in Appendix A of Title III, which you have just finished reading before this material on Title II on this web page.. For reasons of space, we shall not copy the rest of Appendix A to Title II into this web page, but instead, we shall provide the Link that can take you to that material, if desired, on the government website.. ada.. gov.. That Link is:.. gov/regs2010/titleII_2010/reg2_2010.. html.. is also providing an excerpt from the one page.. FACT SHEET for Title II.. with the Summary of the changes made about Service Animals.. This may be of interest since the wording is different than that given in the ADA Service Animal Definition.. A FACT Sheet with the exact same wording on Service Animals was issued by the Department of Justice at.. for Title III, which applies to businesses and commercial facilities.. FACT SHEET Highlights of the Final Rule to Amend the Department of Justice's Regulation Implementing Title II of the ADA.. Service Animals.. The rule defines "service animal" as a dog that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability.. The rule states that other animals, whether wild or domestic, do not qualify as service animals.. Dogs that are not trained to perform tasks that mitigate the effects of a disability, including dogs that are used purely for emotional support, are not service animals.. The final rule also clarifies that individuals with mental disabilities who use service animals that are trained to perform a specific task are protected by the ADA.. The rule permits the use of trained miniature horses as alternatives to dogs, subject to certain limitations.. To allow flexibility in situations where using a horse would not be appropriate, the final rule does not include miniature horses in the definition of "service animal.. This concludes the information posted by the U.. Department of Justice to their website,.. , pertaining to Service Animals that was issued in connection with the Final Rule for Title II and Title III of the ADA.. This material which IAADP provides as a public service can be found at the link below on the ADA website maintained by the U.. Department of Justice.. The Final Rule shall take effect six months from the date it is published in the Federal Register.. gov/regs2010/ADAregs2010.. htm.. Return to IAADP home page..

    Original link path: /doj-def-comments-Title-II-III-SA.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP Minimum Training Standards for Public Access
    Descriptive info: IAADP Minimum Training Standards for Public Access.. IAADP's overall mission is to foster the assistance dog movement in the USA and other countries.. As part of this mission, we seek to promote the responsible use of access rights in the disabled community.. For over 80 years, assistance dogs have worked successfully in public and won the public's acceptance by achieving high behavioral and training standards which set them apart from pets and other animals.. Their exemplary conduct led to state legislatures granting access rights to the blind, deaf and mobility impaired.. Those early teams paved the way for the Americans With Disabilities Act, which has opened the door to individuals with a wide range of physical and mental impairments being able to have access rights.. In response to many inquiries from disabled citizens who want to train a dog to be their assistance dog, but tell us they do not know how much training or what kinds of training to give the dog, IAADP has developed a set of Minimum Training Standards for Public Access.. These are drawn from the Minimum Training Standards for Service Dogs first established a decade ago by Assistance Dogs International (ADI) with consumer input from IAADP.. Visit.. assistancedogsinternational.. If you are a disabled person and want the right to be accompanied by an assistance dog in public, we encourage you to meet or exceed the minimum standards set forth below for training an assistance dog for public access.. Disabled persons who want to join IAADP as a Partner Member [voting member] must have a professionally trained guide, hearing or service dog from a Provider or a dog at least twelve months old whom they have trained to meet or exceed IAADP's Minimum Training Standards.. IAADP Minimum Training Standards for Public Access.. Amount of Schooling:.. an assistance dog should be given a minimum of one hundred twenty (120) hours of schooling over a period of Six Months or more.. * At least thirty (30) hours should be devoted to outings that will prepare the dog to work obediently and unobtrusively in public places.. **.. Obedience Training:.. a dog must master the basic obedience skills: "Sit, Stay, Come, Down, Heel" and a dropped leash recall in a store in response to verbal commands and/or hand signals.. 3.. Manners:.. a dog must acquire proper social behavior skills.. It includes at a minimum:.. No aggressive behavior toward people or other animals - no biting, snapping, snarling, growling or lunging and barking at them when working off your property.. No soliciting food or petting from other people while on duty.. No sniffing merchandise or people or intruding into another dog s space while on duty.. Socialize to tolerate strange sights, sounds, odors etc.. in a wide variety of public settings.. Ignores food on the floor or dropped in the dog s vicinity while working outside the home.. Works calmly on leash.. No unruly behavior or unnecessary vocalizations in public settings.. No urinating or defecating in public unless given a specific command or signal to toilet in an appropriate place.. 4.. Disability Related Tasks:.. the dog must be individually trained to perform identifiable tasks on command or cue for the benefit of the disabled human partner.. This includes alerting to sounds, medical problems, certain scents like peanuts or situations if training is involved.. For a definition of a "task" and "individually trained, and what is not a task and many examples of tasks performed by different kinds of assistance dogs,.. Click Here.. Prohibited Training:.. Any training that arouses a dog s prey drive or fear to elicit a display of aggression for guard or defense purposes is strictly prohibited.. Non aggressive barking as a trained behavior is permitted in appropriate situations.. (See IAADP s ban on the enrollment of protection trained, attack trained or aggressive dogs as an assistance dog with our organization.. ).. 6.. A Trainer s Responsibilities:.. Trainers function as ambassadors for the assistance dog movement.. This includes a disabled owner trainer, a provider s staff or a volunteer with a puppy or adult dog in training.. It also includes an assistance dog partner or able bodied facilitator helping a disabled loved one to keep up an assistance dog s training.. At a minimum, you should:.. Know pertinent canine laws (i.. leash laws and public access laws).. Ensure the dog is healthy, flea free and the rabies vaccination is up to date.. Take time to make sure your dog is well groomed and free of any foul odor.. Show respect and consideration to other people and property.. Use humane training methods; monitor the dog s stress level; provide rest breaks.. Carry clean up materials.. Arrange for prompt clean up if a dog eliminates or gets sick.. Be polite and willing to educate the public about assistance dogs and access rights.. *.. The 120 hours of schooling includes the time invested in homework training sessions between obedience classes or lessons from an experienced dog trainer.. **.. Eligibility for Certification from a provider who supports IAADP s Minimum Training Standards for Public Access may require you turn in a weekly training log to document your dog received a minimum of 120 hours of schooling over a period of six months or more.. (See Sample Training Log).. PUBLIC ACCESS TEST.. How will you know when your dog is ready to graduate from an "in training" status to the status of a full fledged assistance dog with whom you are entitled to have public access rights?.. An excellent tool for evaluating a team's readiness to graduate [e.. finish up formal training] is the Public Access Certification Test (PACT) which can be found on the website of Assistance Dogs International at.. The ADI Public Access Certification Test was developed over 15 years ago as a consumer protection measure by the ADI Team Testing Committee, which included input from both providers and IAADP Partner members.. Overall, the goal of the test is to discover whether or not a particular team is ready to go places out in public without trainer supervision.. The safety of the dog, the handler and the public were the main considerations in developing the specific exercises for testing the team.. This test creates a level playing field, since it does not matter whether it is a guide, hearing or service dog team being tested or who trained the dog.. What matters is the team s performance.. Every ADI program is required to administer this test before graduating and credentialing a team.. Disability mitigating tasks or work are not critiqued during the test.. However, to establish a dog s eligibility to take this test to become an assistance dog, ADI programs would ask for a demo in advance of at least three service dog tasks, three hearing dog sound alerts or a series of tasks known as guide dog work.. To document the dog performs tasks in the home such as seizure response work, alerting to an attack of hypoglycemia late at night or fetching a portable phone or beverage, a program may ask the client to submit a video tape of the task(s).. The Public Access Test evaluates the dog's obedience and manners and the handler's skills in a variety of situations which include:.. A.. The handler's abilities to: ( 1 ) safely load and unload the dog from a vehicle; ( 2 )  ...   refuses the Forward command in specific situations that would result in injury, such as an automobile entering the team s path.. Examples of individually trained tasks include retrieving a phone, providing deep pressure therapy during a panic attack or providing balance support on a staircase to prevent a fall.. What is NOT an individually trained task?.. Spontaneous behavior a dog occasionally exhibits such as licking someone's face or barking does not qualify as a "trained task" under ADA even if it accidentally or coincidentally has a beneficial result.. While everyone enjoys the emotional, social and safety benefits that a dog's presence can provide, those benefits do not constitute trained tasks that would transform a disabled person's pet into a legitimate Service Dog under ADA.. Why are individually trained Tasks so important?.. Trained tasks that mitigate the effects of a disabling condition are the legal basis for granting access rights to disabled handlers under the Americans With Disabilities Act.. An assistance dog with this special training is viewed as assistive technology / medical equipment, not as a pet.. Businesses have the right to ask a disabled person, "What Tasks does your service animal perform?" This question can be asked if there is any doubt about the dog s legal status and whether to impose their restrictive pet policies.. An acceptable answer might be, "my service dog is trained to get help for me in a medical crisis by ____________.. " (Fill in the blank as to the specific task) You do not have to reveal your disability in formulating your reply.. Businesses also have the right to exclude any animal, including a service animal, who threatens the health or safety of other people through aggressive or unruly behavior.. An assistance dog can also be evicted for disruptive behavior that interferes with a business providing goods or services.. The DOJ used the example of a dog barking in a movie theater.. Task examples:.. Traditional Tasks performed by Guide, Hearing and Service Dogs.. Task examples: Tasks for Service Dogs for Persons with a Psychiatric Disability.. Back to top.. IAADP Policy Prohibiting the Enrollment of Protection Trained or Aggressive dogs.. Any dog who is protection trained, attack trained or one who exhibits aggressive behavior in violation of our Minimum Training Standards for Public Access is NOT eligible for enrollment as an Assistance Dog in IAADP, or renewal, no matter what disability related tasks or alerts the dog is said to perform.. If an IAADP Partner member's dog later displays aggressive behavior and cannot be rehabilitated within a reasonable time period, ethically, that dog should be retired as unfit for duty outside the home, as the dog does not qualify as an assistance dog under our Minimum Training Standards for Public Access.. Non aggressive barking as a trained behavior will be acceptable in appropriate situations.. SAMPLE TRAINING LOG & instructions below, how to fill in a Log.. TRAINING LOG.. Owner Trainer s Name:.. Dog s Name:.. Breed:.. Gender:.. Age:.. Week of: ____________________Hours( on Site) + ( Outings).. Health:.. Problems:.. Outings:.. Socialization:.. Obedience:.. Service Dog Tasks:.. Comments:.. How to Fill In Your TRAINING LOG.. Source:.. Rescue? Breeder?.. Breed or Mix:.. Week of:.. May 2 - 8, 2010 - 8 hrs.. Total Hours.. (.. 5 hrs.. on Site).. + (.. Outings).. Make a note if you gave Heartworm Preventative this week and /or used monthly flea control like Advantage or changed Flea & Tick collar.. Make other notes, such as treated ear infection.. Anal gland scooting.. had vet empty? Did you change diet? Progress on new diet or digestive upsets? Treated hot spot? Trimmed nails? Blowing coat? Improved on car sickness?.. Are there any particular problems distressing you? Has there been improvement on any of the problems mentioned in previous logs? (e.. Barking at other dogs, becoming over excited in the presence of other animals or fearful of getting into the back seat of the car, or refuses to potty outside of his backyard or won t use other footing except grass, etc.. ).. 1 Hour Mon.. Canine Good Citizen (CGC) class, Trainers ( your name, instructor s name ).. 45 min.. Tues.. Bank - inside w/permission, parking lot work too; Trainer - (yr.. name).. 1 hr.. 15 min.. Thurs.. Petsmart; Trainers - ( your name, assistant s name).. 1 ½ hr.. Saturday Petsmart, more work on dog distraction issue, Trainer - ( your name).. Socialization:.. What novel sights, sounds, smells, taste or touch, footing, was the dog exposed to in an urban, suburban or rural environment in different kinds of weather? (e.. a band in a park, a parade, a mounted policeman, Little League game, strangers in ethnic garb, potty in street near curb?) Did the dog improve when exposed to something that caused signs of stress earlier, such as an elevator ride, dog barking at him from behind a fence, working near an escalator, climbing a staircase or when asked to potty on different types of ground? What needs more work? (e.. walking near heavy traffic, motorcycle revving up, garbage truck, approaching a mirror, screaming kids on schoolyard playground, holding a Sit Stay during a thunderstorm,etc.. Where did you practice basic commands? (e.. house, garage, neighborhood, outside shopping center).. Any progress? What needs improvement? (e.. out of sight Stays or Heel w/halt instead of Sit for balance or wheelchair work.. ) Practice Public Access Test exercises.. holding Sit or Down when adult or child pets the dog or someone drops food on the floor or puts plate down by dog or passes with a shopping cart.. Practice Stay or Come with a dropped leash indoors, outdoors in safe area.. Have assistant tease dog at a distance with food, smooching, say Hi, puppy, puppy or bounce a ball while you keep him focused on you in a Sit or Down Stay.. Advanced - practice Stay in public rest room, under table in restaurant, in stores in sight, you out of sight around a corner.. Off leash heeling, Downs, recall indoors, outdoors in safe fenced area.. Service Dog Tasks:.. What did you introduce this week? What progress has dog made on various tasks, like fetch the phone? Beginner, intermediate or advanced stage? Any setback? Where did you practice?.. Which manners were a priority this week? What improved? What needs more work? For example: Say please [with Sit Stay] for Supper, for Exiting house.. expanded from 30 seconds to one minute! Enter, exit, riding in a car - improved.. Lie quietly on side for nail grinder, grooming - needs work! Watchdog suppression - needs work! Jumping on visitors - needs work.. Honor system - respecting Leave It edict re: bowl of treats on end table, 24/7.. 3rd week, also leaves bowl of treats on kitchen counter alone! Paw on knee - rarely tries this dominance behavior anymore.. Licking self in public - only needed one correction this week, an uh uh with my disapproving glare at him.. Doesn t do it at church anymore or in grocery store.. No sniffing other dogs while on duty at obedience class or in neighborhood - needs more work.. Anything unusual, worrisome, cute, exceptional? Did you read a book, see a video that helped with training? Reason for not practicing this week (e.. sick, injured, family funeral, or dog neutered and must be kept very quiet for two weeks? etc.. ) Overall progress.. fair? Good?..

    Original link path: /iaadp-minimum-training-standards-for-public-access.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP: Partners Forum Newsletter
    Descriptive info: IAADP.. Assistance Dog Partners.. IAADP's.. PARTNERS FORUM.. Newsletter Archive.. IAADP's global information sharing & advocacy newsletter links together disabled persons with guide, hearing and service dogs and assistance dog training programs on 5 continents.. Under the editorship of Joan Froling, our publication has been honored for excellence in the field of Canine Newspapers by the Dog Writers Association of America at their annual Awards Banquet in New York City on numerous occasions since 1994.. Browse many articles on different kinds of assistance dogs (i.. guide dogs, hearing dogs and service dogs for mobility impairments, autism, diabetes, seizure alert / response, schizophrenia, wheelchair guide dogs, dual or triple purpose dogs and more).. Learn about pioneering efforts around the world, IAADP's extensive advocacy work and challenging access issues.. Features updates on assistance dog related legislation and government regulations in North America, the UK, Japan and other countries.. Discover training information, new products and equipment, and interesting research.. Enjoy personal stories, humorous anecdotes and much more!.. * * * To help with advocacy work and stay current on "news" affecting travel and access with assistance dogs,.. join as a member.. ! These archived newsletters are nearly a year (or more) behind the latest quarterly issue of "Partners Forum.. NOTE:.. To view newsletter in WordPerfect format, right-click on the.. WPD.. link, select.. SAVE  ...   3Mb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 3.. 742Kb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 102Kb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 119Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 2.. 765Kb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 3Mb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 5Mb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 1.. Volume 15, No.. 4.. Volume 14, No.. 702Kb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 101Kb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 122Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 650Kb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 106Kb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 118Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 267Kb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 124Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. Volume 13, No.. 3Mb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 113Kb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 145Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 4Mb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 105Kb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 136Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 341Kb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 100Kb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 100Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 1Mb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. Volume 12, No.. 3/4 (Double Issue).. 3Mb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 200Kb, Microsoft Word Document Format, No Photos.. 200Kb, WordPerfect Document Format, No Photos.. 400Kb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos.. 2Mb, Adobe Acrobat Reader Format with Photos..

    Original link path: /newsletter.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP MEMBERSHIP - Information, Benefits, Application
    Descriptive info: IAADP MEMBERSHIP - Information, Benefits, Application.. Who is eligible for Membership in IAADP?.. IAADP primarily represents and advocates for people with disabilities working with guide, hearing and service dogs.. In addition, anyone with a personal or professional interest in the assistance dog community is welcome to join as a Friend or Provider Member and contribute to IAADP's global information sharing and advocacy network.. MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES.. Which one are you eligible for?.. Partner Membership:.. - open to disabled persons working with an adult guide, hearing or service dog obtained from a Provider or one trained by the owner for a minimum of Six Months.. Prior to enrollment, training must be completed in accordance with the.. Minimum Training Standards.. for obedience, manners and disability related tasks.. For.. ,.. Friend Membership:.. - open to disabled individuals with a puppy or dog "in training" for a career as an assistance dog who has not yet completed the required amount of schooling to become eligible for a Partner Membership.. Health care professionals, puppy raisers and others interested in the assistance dog movement are also encouraged to become an IAADP Friend.. Provider Membership:.. - open to training programs and professional dog trainers who provide task trained assistance dogs to disabled persons.. Also open to programs or trainers assisting disabled individuals to train their own dogs to meet or exceed our.. Why Are Trained Tasks So Important?.. Trained tasks that mitigate or lessen the effects of a disabling condition are the legal basis for granting access rights to disabled handlers under the Americans With Disabilities Act.. Examples include but are not limited to, guiding the blind, alerting the deaf to specific sounds, wheelchair pulling, balance support, retrieving dropped objects or providing different kinds of trained assistance in a medical crisis.. Thus the team will be exempt under ADA from whatever restrictions apply to pets in places of public accommodation such as a business, restaurant or hotel and on public transportation.. For more information on the wide variety of trained tasks performed by guide dogs, hearing and service dogs, choose one of the following:.. Task examples:.. Tasks for Service Dogs for Persons with a Psychiatric Disability.. ATTENTION:.. Dogs utilized for Emotional Support, Companionship or Therapy may provide a feeling of comfort, safety or  ...   PO Box 638 * Sterling Hts, MI 48311).. Name (print clearly or type) ____________________________________________________.. Address: ______________________________ City: ______________.. State / Province: _______________ Zip / Postal Code: ______________ Country: _______________.. Phone: _______________________ EMAIL: _______________________________________.. Check all below which apply to you:.. ____ North American Partner New Membership (USA and Canada) $40 (*3 years for the price of 2 years $80).. ____ North American Partner Renewal Membership (USA and Canada) $40 (*3 years for the price of 2 years $80).. ____ International Partner Membership (as I reside outside the USA and Canada ) $20 (*3 years for the price of 2 years $40).. ____ I am eligible to be an IAADP Partner (voting member) as my dog meets the.. IAADP Minimum Training Standards.. (see.. Partner Membership Definition.. section above).. ____ I am an IAADP Friend (non-voting member) $40.. ____ I am a Provider Member (train assistance dogs for others) $50.. ____ I m partnered with a:.. (Please Circle One).. Guide Dog Hearing Dog Service Dog.. ____ My assistance dog is trained by me to the required.. ____ My Provider trained assistance dog is from: _____________________________ (Provider s Name).. Dog s name: ___________________ Breed / Mix _____________ Date of Dog s Birth ___________.. Partner Member Affadavit.. :.. (note: your signature is.. required.. for enrollment or renewal).. By signing this document, I affirm the information provided on this application is correct and truthful.. Signature: ________________________________________ Date: ______________________.. Choose Newsletter Format:.. Print Cassette Disk Data CD.. Submit application with a check or money order made payable to.. Applicants outside the U.. must send U.. currency or an international check / money order.. Applications may also be submitted online and alternative methods of payment are available on the IAADP website using PayPal.. Please Note: From the time of receipt of payment, a period of 45 to 60 days will be needed to process the application.. Membership begins immediately upon the receipt of your Membership Card and Packet.. Please be patient as we rely on volunteers to carry out most of the work done by IAADP for its members.. Mail to: IAADP c/o Dana Spears * PO Box 638 * Sterling Hts, MI 48311.. Questions? Email the Database Manager at.. database@iaadp.. If you wish to print out a One-Page Membership Application Form,..

    Original link path: /iaadp-membership-application.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP Donations
    Descriptive info: IAADP Donations.. Thankfully, we can now accept online donations using Mastercard, Visa, Discover, or American Express via Paypal, regardless of whether you have a Paypal account.. We have three giving options below including: a one-time donation, a recurring donation -- an example of this would be a monthly pledge, and a memorial gift.. We appreciate your contributions and hope to make it as convenient as possible.. You can reach IAADP by phone at: 888-54-IAADP [888-544-2237] and/or send mail to: IAADP c/o Dana Spears - PO Box 638 - Sterling Hts, MI 48311.. One time donation:.. For a one-time donation, a Paypal account is NOT required.. If you do not have a Paypal account, you can enter your credit card information, name and address, etc.. If you do have a Paypal account, you can login and use your existing account to make a donation.. I want to give a one-time donation for:.. $..  ...   information at the secure PayPal site for one of the following: a credit card, a debit card, or a bank account.. We ask for a minimum monthly donation of $3.. 00.. I want to set-up a monthly donation for:.. (amount) for.. #.. (months).. Memorial Gift:.. You can specify that your donation is a memorial and for whom by entering the information in the "Memorial Information" box on the Paypal site after you enter the amount below and click the memorial button.. If you are seeking the "Ed Eames Memorial Message and Donation section," please click on the Link at the end of this sentence to instantly reach that new webpage.. Click Here for Memorial Section.. Please do not use this current donation form as it is undergoing a revision.. Thank you.. I want to make a Memorial or Honorarium Gift for:.. Return to IAADP Membership BENEFITS.. |.. Return to IAADP Home Page..

    Original link path: /iaadp-paypal-recurring.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP Bookstore
    Descriptive info: International Association of.. Notice to readers:.. Contact information on how to order various publications is provided solely as a convenience to website visitors.. We do not receive income from any books listed.. All proceeds from sale of the DVDs however, go to benefit IAADP thanks to the copies generously sponsored by.. Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc.. DVD: PARTNERS IN INDEPENDENCE, General Version.. by Ed and Toni Eames 2009.. Celebrating the human animal bond, Partners in Independence illustrates the wide variety of tasks performed by assistance dogs to enhance the quality of life of their disabled partners.. This DVD is filled with real life scenes of appealing working dogs.. Guide dogs, who assist the blind and visually impaired, are shown safely negotiating the environment, guiding their partners on public transportation and using intelligent disobedience to avoid a speeding car.. Hearing dogs, who assist the deaf and hard of hearing, are portrayed alerting to a smoke alarm, a crying baby and the partner s name.. Service dogs, who assist individuals with other disabilities, are depicted opening a refrigerator, retrieving a crutch and pulling off socks.. Information is also presented about puppies preparing for future careers as working assistance dogs.. A variety of young dogs are shown learning to walk on slick floors, ride in elevators and calmly lie on the floor in a restaurant.. Professionally done, this engaging video is a visual delight that will be of great value in educating the public about the role of assistance dogs in the lives of their disabled teammates.. It will also be of interest to those considering partnering with an assistance dog.. This 12-minute video sponsored by.. was written and produced by Ed and Toni Eames.. All proceeds go to benefit the International Association of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP), a cross disability consumer advocacy organization.. Order it online at.. iaadp.. or by sending check or money order made out to IAADP in the amount of fifteen dollars ($15.. 00) to Ed Eames, 3376 North Wishon, Fresno, CA 93704.. A companion book also called.. Partners in Independence.. is available.. DVD: PARTNERS IN INDEPENDENCE, Veterinarian Version.. For the Animal Health Care Community.. Celebrating the human animal bond, Partners in Independence  ...   with other disabilities.. Partners in Independence is about those dogs and the disabled people whose lives they enhance.. These are the stories of visionaries who recognized the potential and converted canine potentialities into realities.. Thanks to the dogs you will meet in this book, thousands of disabled people enjoy more enriched lives.. They pursue careers, attend school, make friends, and cope with the situations each day brings.. They and their dogs are best friends in the truest sense of the word.. Ed and Toni Eames are active members of the world they describe.. With their guide dogs, they have traveled the world, educated others and met a diverse segment of humanity featured in this book.. They present the challenge, the humor, the determination and the pathos familiar to disabled people everywhere who confidently go through doors opened with the help of their canine partners!.. Includes chapters on the history of assistance dogs, traveling with assistance dogs, caring for assistance dogs, rights of the disabled and contact information to the assistance dog world.. 232 pages, paperback.. $15.. 95.. ISBN:0-9700494-4-7.. Braille and Cassette copies are available from the National Library Service.. For an interview with Ed and Toni Eames, call them at (559) 224-0544.. or email at.. toni@iaadp.. Published and distributed by Barkleigh Productions, Inc.. 6 State Road #113, Mechanicsburg PA 17050.. (717) 691-3388.. sally@barkleigh.. com.. Order online at:.. off-lead.. TEAMWORK & TEAMWORK II.. by Stewart Nordensson & Lydia Kelley (1996, 1998).. Available from TOP DOG Publications, 5049 E.. Broadway Blvd, #102, Tucson, AZ, 85711.. Web site:.. topdogusa.. Outstanding training manuals for obedience and service dog work for people with physical disabilities with many suggestions for ways to overcome or get around problems presented by various disabilities.. Also available in DVD or Video.. GUIDE TO ASSISTANCE DOG LAWS, Second EDITION - Legal Access.. Guide.. for the USA, Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.. Pocketsize edition from 2006.. A PDF version available online for consulting.. An Order Form for this handy guide with a summary of the laws in each state in the USA and other laws is also available to you at the website address to follow:.. org/guidetodoglaws.. php.. Return to IAADP homepage..

    Original link path: /bookstore.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP Welcome and Introduction
    Descriptive info: WELCOME.. to our site!.. When we first discussed the possibility of developing a web site, the issue that we all agreed on was the need to provide a way for individuals to gather comprehensive information about the assistance dog community.. Many of us had gone through the frustrating experience of spending numerous hours on the telephone trying to gather information, or receiving information and finding it only provided a limited perspective on a complex field.. Others recounted how they were hesitant to raise questions that might display their ignorance or, through their lack of information, made choices that ended up not being appropriate for their needs.. Since one of the primary goals of IAADP is to educate and provide information, we looked at ways that we could develop a resource tool that individuals could learn to rely on not only for comprehensive, but also accurate and objective information about the assistance dog field.. This resource would underscore our belief that if individuals are provided with information that allows them to assess the merits and drawbacks of an issue, they ultimately are able to make the most responsible decision for their particular needs.. In addition to providing these resources to those that visit our site, we also strongly believe that the assistance dog community can benefit from input from our visitors..  ...   out The Photo Gallery.. Ever wonder who actually is a part of the assistance dog communities, and what work they do? Spend some time at:.. Who s Who in the Assistance Dog Field.. Have you encountered access problems or are confused about discussion involving different assistance dog laws? You are not alone.. We have plenty of information and a number of resources to help you deal with your concerns.. Make sure to visit.. Assistance Dog Laws and Legal Resources.. We have also provided two general categories of web links in the areas of canine information and disability resources:.. Canine Corner.. We feel these two fields naturally supplement the assistance dog field, and offer information that individuals may find of use.. Given the vast number of web sites on the Internet, we have tried to limit our lists to those sites that provide the broadest and most up-to-date information.. We want you to get to know IAADP and the benefits we provide to our members.. Although a relatively new organization, we are proud of our accomplishments to date, and are pleased to share some of those efforts with you.. We are always looking for new ways to serve the assistance dog community.. Feel free to share your ideas with us.. We welcome your comments and suggestions.. The 1997 Web Site Committee..

    Original link path: /welcome.html
    Open archive

  • Title: IAADP: A Brief History and Special Projects
    Descriptive info: Building Our Partnership Support Network.. IAADP is a non profit organization that was launched in 1993 at the joint Delta Society and Assistance Dogs International Conference.. A historic meeting took place between consumer representatives from many states partnered with guide dogs, hearing dogs and service dogs.. The outcome was an unanimous vote to establish an independent cross disability consumer organization that could represent all Assistance Dog Partners (not just one faction) and advance consumer interests in the assistance dog field.. IAADP's mission is to (1) provide assistance dog partners with a voicein the assistance dog field; (2) enable those partnered with guide dogs,hearing dogs and service dogs to work together on issues of mutual concern;(3) to foster the disabled person / assistance dog partnership.. A quarterly newsletter and an annual meeting in conjunction with the Assistance Dogs International Conference were chosen as the most effective ways to link together assistance dog partners from different programs as well as those partnered with privately trained or owner trained dogs.. Board members are drawn from the population of disabled people partnered with guide dogs, hearing dogs and service dogs.. Partners' Forum.. IAADP publishes the quarterly newsletter, "Partners' Forum," under the editorship of Joan Froling.. Subscriber/members are encouraged to submit news of legislation, access cases, articles about issues of concern, letters to the editor and opinion pieces.. An Annual Short Story Contest is conducted and prizes are awarded to the winners.. (Feel free to direct your entry to the editor at address listed on the title page of our site.. ).. To promote outreach and education, "Partners' Forum" is sent to all the veterinary school libraries in North America.. It is received by assistance dog programs throughout North America and the United Kingdom and by many assistance dog partners and other organizations with an interest in the assistance dog field.. Beginning to meet its goal of becoming truly international, subscriber members are now found in Europe, Central and South America, Israel, Malaysia, South Africa, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.. The "Partners'Forum" has become a well respected publication honored by the Dog Writers Association of America for excellence.. Access and Education Brochure.. During its existence the IAADP has had many notable accomplishments.. One of its most outstanding has been the publication of a informative and persuasive Access Education Brochure that can be inexpensively reproduced and utilized by all  ...   and Bayer, IAADP has put together a comprehensive Assistance Dog "Emergency Recovery" Protection system.. The goal is to try to ensure that if the team becomes separated, the dog will be well cared for and reunited with the human partner or should the partner become incapacitated, the dog will reach his/her designated Emergency Care giver.. With funding from Bayer Animal Health, IAADP now provides this "kit" free of charge to facilitate that goal.. It is coordinated with the AKC's offer of free enrollment for assistance dogs in the AKC Companion Animal Recovery program, a national database with a 24 hr.. 800 number.. The AKC official enrollment form must be obtained from the IAADP or an assistance dog program on the IAADP List.. The dog's tattoo number and/or microchip number plus special instructions from the assistance dog partner listed in the AKC computer makes it possible to quickly reunite the team.. In the AVID program, IAADP members can call an 800 number and obtain the name of a local veterinarian willing to provide the microchipping.. Until the information is recorded in the AVID lost dog recovery data base, the veterinarian's record provides the same coverage.. The assistance dog team is therefore protected from the moment they leave the veterinarian.. AVID will replace the microchip so it does not cost the veterinarian any money to do it.. AVID also provides "partners" with free registration in PETRACK, its own registry.. Details on how to implement the offer will be provided in new member information packet.. To be eligible to receive any partner benefits, the partner's signature must be on file (see membership form).. Assistance Dog Partnership Support Network.. Although developed as a consumer advocacy effort, the IAADP welcomes advice and input from all those with a personal or professional interest in the assistance dog field.. It seeks to foster a sense of community among all the stakeholders in the success of the assistance dog movement.. In addition to staying in touch through Partners' Forum, subscriber members are given the opportunity to attend and participate in the annual ADI/IAADP Conference workshops and IAADP Annual Meeting and the ADI/IAADP Banquet.. To obtain more information about IAADP's activities or if interested in volunteering to help with special projects or the conference, you may contact Joan Froling, IAADP Editor, at 38691 Filly Drive, Sterling Hts.. , MI 48310; or call (586)826-3938..

    Original link path: /history.html
    Open archive





  • Archived pages: 165