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    Archived pages: 27 . Archive date: 2013-12.

  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: .. GRAVITAS DVD.. Free bittorrent download..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics | Gravitas: Portraits of a Universe in Motion
    Descriptive info: GRAVITAS: Portraits of a Universe in Motion.. Animations:.. John Dubinski.. Music:.. John Kameel Farah.. (DVD - NTSC format).. ".. Gravitas points clearly at ties between the ideas of Isaac Newton and the music of Bach.. To do this with sounds and images that appeal to club kids and new music fans equally is a major achievement.. ".. - John Terauds, Toronto Star, March, 9 2006.. (read review).. "Gravitas is a truly elegant creation.. Visually, each segment is moving digital art that's even more hypnotic when projected onto a large wall.. - Mark Hasan, KQEK, 2007.. More reviews.. DVD Liner Notes.. Gravitas Live Performance.. Gravitas podcast on iTunes.. Listen to Farah's music on Myspace.. View tracks.. 1.. Cosmic Cruise.. 2.. Galactic Encounters.. 3.. Swarm.. 4.. Nightfall.. 5.. Klemperer's Dream.. 6.. Spiral Metamorphosis.. 7.. Future Sky.. 8..  ...   and galaxy interactions are presented as moving portraits of cosmic evolution.. Billions of years of complex gravitational choreography are presented in 9 animations - each one interpreted with an original musical composition inspired by the exquisite movements of gravity.. The result is an emotive and spiritually uplifting synthesis of science and art.. Astrophysicist.. combines a knowledge of cosmology, galaxy dynamics and computer graphics to create breathtaking portraits of a universe in motion.. Composer-pianist.. merges the soundworlds of renaissance and baroque counterpoint, free improvisation, Middle-Eastern music, minimalism, techno and electronica to create a musical feast that crosses time and dimension.. FREE DOWNLOAD!.. Burnable DVD disk image.. bittorrent file.. Or select destination for purchase:.. Buy in CANADA.. Buy in USA.. Buy in the rest of the WORLD.. Credit cards accepted with PayPal.. PRICE: US $15.. 00.. (plus shipping)..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics | Contact
    Descriptive info: Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics.. 50 St.. George St.. University of Toronto.. Toronto, Ontario.. CANADA M5S 3H4.. e-mail:.. dubinski@astro.. utoronto.. ca.. Download my CV (pdf).. (Last updated June 2008).. Copyright Statement.. All images and animations are Copyright © 2008 John Dubinski.. All music is Copyright © 2008 John Kameel Farah.. You are welcome to use the images and animations for personal and educational purposes.. If you wish to use the images in publication or incorporate the animations into video or film for broadcast or public presentation for profit please contact me to discuss licensing fees..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: REVIEWS.. DVD Depicts Celestial Ballet.. John Terauds, Toronto Star, March 9, 2006.. Once in a while an event comes along that reminds us how inadequate words are in describing music and visual art.. Tonight's launch of Gravitas, a new DVD of sounds and images, at the Music Gallery is a case in point.. The backgrounds on both component elements are highly complex, yet the result - a 45-minute meditation on continuous transformation - is simplicity itself.. The moving pictures are eight sequences of inter-galactic transformation based on Newton's laws of physics, created on a supercomputer by University of Toronto astronomer John Dubinski.. One sees graceful clouds and millions of stars dividing, moving and colliding in a ceaseless celestial ballet.. The soundtrack is a trance-inducing landscape inspired by the vast history of music, from 16th-century English pavanes, to techno, to traditional Arab influences.. The interaction of looped beats and repeating sound samples has the power to pull us out of ourselves - a measure of great music.. Toronto-based composer John Kameel Farah is working on the boundaries of new music, one hand poised over his Mac computer keyboard, the other ready to strike a harpsichord.. The result has  ...   all sorts.. He is a big history buff and is deeply worried about the current state of world affairs.. Born in Brampton, he recently connected with his Palestinian heritage, and its long and pained history.. Farah pays the bills by teaching piano.. This has included giving master classes in Ramallah, East Jerusalem and Bethlehem.. His first-hand experiences with Middle- Eastern conflict are never far from his thoughts.. But he says he's not out to make political proclamations.. "I don't use music to make a point, but it happens anyway, in a natural way," he says.. "It comes from my life.. ".. For Farah, it's a quest to understand how and why the world is as it is.. And the insights he gleans are channelled right into his soundscapes.. "Maybe the only truth I can express is in music," he says.. His work with Dubinski in Gravitas points clearly at ties between the ideas of Isaac Newton and the music of Bach.. WHAT Gravitas DVD release.. WHERE The Music Gallery, 197 John St.. WHEN Tonight.. Pre-show @ 7 30 p.. m.. Gravitas show @ 8 15 p.. TICKETS $10-$15 @ 416-204-1080.. Credit: Copyright 2006 Toronto Star March 9, 2006..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: See NEWS.. See CONCERTS LECTURES.. Review at KQEK by Mark Hasan, 2007.. DVD Depicts Celestial Ballet, Toronto Star, March 9, 2006.. Now Magazine, March 9, 2006.. Interview on the Arts Tonight with Eleanor Wachtel.. CBC Radio, May 2005.. (listen)..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: Go back.. Understanding the Dynamic Universe.. When we look with wonder at galaxies in the beautiful images from space, we immediately perceive that these vast systems of stars are in motion.. The spiral patterns of galaxies intuitively suggest a system in rotation.. We have all seen the spiral vortices of water going down the drain or similar patterns in cream stirred into a cup of coffee.. The distorted forms of close pairs of galaxies with their long tails and interconnecting bridges of stars are not as intuitive but do suggest that these systems are interacting in a strong and violent way.. We now know that these complex patterns are manifestations of the long reach of gravity generated by the stars, gas and dark matter that make up the galaxies.. Unfortunately, we cannot witness the dynamics of galaxies directly since the rotational times are typically hundreds of millions of years, much longer than our hundred-year life spans.. Galaxies therefore appear as still-lifes to us - incredibly beautiful images - but frozen snapshots presenting single frames from a series of prolonged cosmic dramas.. The 9 computer animations presented on this DVD bring life to the snapshots of galaxies and present the universe as a place that is in constant motion, a place that is evolving and changing in complex ways over billions of years.. Each animation is a celebration of gravity acting in its purest form through Newton's laws of motion.. While Einstein usually gets most of the credit for linking gravity to the larger universe, Newtons laws still reign supreme for describing most of the behaviour in the solar system, star clusters, galaxies and even bigger things like galaxy clusters and the large-scale structure.. Small, high-density objects such as neutron stars and blackholes and the biggest thing we know, the universe seen as a whole, require Einstein's detailed formulation of gravity in his Theory of General Relativity.. The phenomena of everything in between these two length scales can be described very well by the methods of good old fashioned Newtonian gravity.. The study of the motion of stars in clusters, galaxies and the large-scale universe is known as stellar or galactic dynamics.. The underlying description is Newton's N-body problem: the computation of the motion of "N" (a large number) bodies (e.. g.. planets or stars) each of which is pulling and being pulled by every other body through the force of gravity.. The force between bodies is inversely proportional to square of the distance between them.. Newton's great triumph was the discovery of an exact solution of the two-body problem for the inverse-square force law that predicted that planets should move on Keplerian elliptical orbits.. However, for N greater than two the problem had no general solution.. In the pre-computer era, this problem was virtually intractable because of the large amount of computing needed even for small systems of bodies.. Only complex perturbation calculations could be done to understand the subtleties of the deviation from elliptical orbits of the inner planets due to the gravitational effects of Jupiter and Saturn.. For a long time, the solar system was the only part of the universe that was seen as dynamic and studied in detail with Newtons physics.. However, as telescopic observations expanded our view of the universe it became clear that larger systems of gravitating bodies also occured in nature.. Star clusters containing hundreds and even as many as a million stars in globular clusters were commonly observed.. And finally astronomers realized that the great spiral nebulae were actually large systems of stars often laid out in a disk like the Milky Way but at such great distances that the combined light of their stars appeared as a nebulous haze.. These systems contained hundreds of billions of stars and were configured as disks - much like the layout of the solar system - and were spinning slowly in space.. A typical galaxy is one hundred thousand light years across with a mass of one hundred billion suns implying rotational periods of hundreds of millions of years - timescales so long that their spinning motions could never be perceived in a human life span.. Computing the motion of the 9 planets in the solar system was hard enough.. How could one possibly deal with one hundred billion stars?.. In the pre-dawn light of the computer era, the Swedish astronomer Erik Holmberg performed a remarkable experiment to explore the gravitational dynamics of interacting galaxies.. On a table top, he laid out two disk configurations of 37 light bulbs, each one representing a spiral galaxy.. Light acted as a proxy for mass.. Since the intensity of light falls off as the inverse square of distance, the combined intensity of light measured by a photocell placed at the position of a light bulb would be proportional to the equivalent force of gravity.. In this way, he meticulously measured the "force" at the position of each light bulb which allowed him to calculate the change in position according to Newton's laws and so solve the N-body problem.. By carefully moving the light bulbs according to this calculation in a series of steps, he was able to follow the motion of this 74 particle system.. He showed that interacting galaxies could excite spiral structures.. The first studies in computational galactic dynamics had begun.. By the sixties, electronic computers became widely available to scientists and early pioneers most notably Sverre Aarseth made a first hard attack at numerical computation of the N-body problem modeling systems with a few hundred particles.. By the early seventies, the Brothers Toomre presented a detailed collection of N-body calculations with accompanying elegantly drafted drawings clearly illustrating that gravity was responsible for the phenomenology of the tails and bridges in real interacting systems of galaxies.. As computers grew in power through the seventies and onward to the end of the century, a variety of new efficient methods were developed for computing the N-body problem to study the detailed dynamics of galaxies and the growth of structure in the universe.. The beautiful animation of the merger of a small group of spiral galaxies created by Joshua Barnes in the early nineties using the tree algorithm invented with Piet Hut led the way inspiring further intense efforts to visualize galactic dynamics.. As we begin the 21st century, the methods for computing the N-body problem have grown greatly in computational efficiency and have been adapted to work on parallel supercomputers: vast arrays of thousands of computational nodes interconnected with a high speed network.. Calculations using tens to hundreds of millions of particles are now routine and the animations presented here are derived from simulations of this size.. There are now some calculations being done with as many as 10 billion particles! In a few short years, it will be possible to compute the N-body problem  ...   of simulations here, it seems that symmetry is preserved even when spiral patterns emerge after the galaxies interact strongly.. But by the end of each sequence, the symmetry is lost.. So is Newton wrong afterall? No! These nonlinear dynamical systems are unstable and become chaotic.. Tiny deviations introduced by computer imprecision are eventually amplified and lead the system away from symmetry.. So these simulations are not just for fun after all.. They are an interesting illustration of the emergence of chaos in nonlinear dynamical systems.. Spiral Metamorphosis (6:18) / 7.. Future Sky (6:37).. The harsh reality of the distant universe with all of its violent interactions seems remote from our human existence and all might seem to be quiet and normal in our home the Milky Way.. But it seems likely that in a mere 3 billion years, our neighbouring galaxy Andromeda and the Milky Way will fall together and have a close collision.. They will likely merge and be reborn as a single giant elliptical galaxy over the course of another billion years or so.. How might this metamorphosis play out and what might you see if you looked up at night over the next 4 billion years! The space between stars is so vast compared to their size that during a galaxy collision no individual stars actually collide with one another.. So our sun and its family of planets will be taking a passive but exciting ride through the pair of coalescing galaxies and take on a spectacular view of the unfolding disaster in relative safety.. I have set up a model system of colliding galaxies that reflects the current state of our the Milky Way and Andromeda system.. There are still some uncertainties about the exact trajectories and masses of the two galaxies but I have set up a plausible case where they fall together and collide almost directly passing within 60000 light years of each other.. Also, I only present the view of the naked stars unobscured by the interstellar gas and dust clouds within the galaxy.. We get a chance to see it all from 4 perspectives: two fixed positions in space a million light years away (Spiral Metamorphosis) and two sky views, the first that projects the full 360 degrees of the sky onto an oval map and the second a view of one hemispheric dome of the night sky.. In the sky views (Future Sky), one particle is identified as the sun within the model of the Milky Way and our view is always from this perpective with our attention directed towards the central bulge of the Galaxy making for a mind boggling spectacle.. The view from far reveals an exquisite ballet of mutual annihilation and transformation into an elliptical galaxy.. The Milky Way is seen coming in from the bottom in a face-on and edge-on view.. After the interaction, long tidal tails of stars are flung out in open spiral patterns from both galaxies by the strong gravitational tides during the interaction.. While separating, the two galaxies develop detailed spiral structure and then fall back for a second collision finally to merge.. The mutual annihilation of the two galaxies leads to a big splash showing up as a complicated system of loops and ripples that represent turning points of stellar orbits.. The two galaxies finally settle down into a single elliptical galaxy surrounded by remnant debris of their violent interaction.. In the sky views, the arch of the Milky Way is apparent at first as a band of stars and tiny Andromeda is seen scrolling past beneath the arch but slowly growing in size as it approaches.. When the 2 galaxies intersect, the sun is flung out far from the colliding pair of galaxies and our view oscillates between a remote view of events to a wild ride right through the centre of the galactic bulge! The orbit of the sun is no longer circular but now follows a convoluted pattern with the distorted gravitational field of the merging galaxies.. A final look back from the far flung sun shows the final merger of the two galaxies.. Galaxies in Collision (7:53).. We revisit the galaxy cluster simulations of Swarm followed by random views of two-galaxy collisions.. The animation begins slowly to allow an appreciation of the grace of gravitational dynamics but the tempo gradually increases to change the impression to a frenetic dance of severe intensity and violence.. The animation ends with a fireworks display of rapid fire merging pairs of galaxies fading into the Hubble Space Telescope image of the The Mice one of the well-known nearby famous pairs of interacting galaxies.. The final image reminds us that we live in one single instant of an evolving universe.. Metamorphosis 3-D (6:13).. I have re-run the simulation of Spiral Metamorphosis using stereoscopic rendering methods to produce a red-blue 3-D animation.. To appreciate this animation, put on the 3-D glasses (red lens over your left eye) and seat yourself in direct line with the centre of the screen at a distance of about 5 times the width of your screen.. Relax your eyes and watch a 3-dimensional rendition of the merger of the Milky Way and Andromeda from 3 different perspectives! In 3-D, the patterns of shells and ripples take on a completely different light and reveal the amazing depths of complexity in the dynamics of galaxies.. About the Music.. An essential component of this compilation of animations is the music of composer-pianist John Kameel Farah.. He draws upon and synthesizes the sound-worlds of renaissance and baroque counterpoint, free improvisation, Middle-Eastern music, ambient minimalism, techno and electronica to create a music that crosses time and dimension.. His creative efforts are fueled by exchanges of physical, spiritual and emotional energies, on both a macro-cosmic and microscopic level.. The accompanying compositions are direct musical interpretations of the unfolding dynamics presented in each animation.. The music provides a wondrous ambience and serene state of mind that permits us to contemplate the beauty of a universe in motion.. For more information on concerts, recordings and projects, please visit www.. johnfarah.. com.. Acknowledgements.. Financial support from Science and Engineering Research Canada, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics and the University of Toronto is gratefully acknowledged.. JD would like to thank Frances, Alicia and Kintaro for their love, support and patience over the years and he would not have started down this road long ago without the backing of his loving parents Margaret and Roman.. JD also tips his hat to James Binney and Scott Tremaine for teaching him much of what he knows about galactic dynamics from their book and Josh Barnes and Piet Hut for inventing the N-body tree algorithm.. JKF would like to thank his parents Nadia and Farid Farah, and A.. G.. Swayze for support and inspiration..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: GRAVITAS at the Great Pyramid of Cholula.. March 16, 2007.. Gravitas was performed live at the.. Great Pyramid of Cholula.. on March 16, 2007 near Puebla, Mexico as part of the 21st Mexican National Congress of Astronomy.. Read.. John Farah's description.. of this very wonderful and nearly disastrous experience! The GRAVITAS videos were initially  ...   stage where John Farah was performing.. Unfortunately, the wind picked up just as the concert was getting underway and blew them down! The concert was stopped briefly and the projectors were pointed at an ancient stone stellae that fronted a human sacrificial altar.. This new projection screen turned the concert into something much more intriguing..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: Gravitas DVD.. Download.. QuickTime (320x240).. QuickTime (480x360).. AVI (320x240).. AVI (640x480).. The atomist philosopher Lucretius wrote some prescient verse describing a universe filled with particles in his book: The Nature of Things.. "All things keep on, in everlasting motion.. Out of the infinite come the particles.. Speeding above, below, in endless dance.. -Lucretius,.. De Rerum Natura.. , c.. 70 BCE.. Cosmic Cruise (1:55)..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: "We find them smaller and fainter, in constantly increasing numbers, and we know that we are reaching into space, farther and farther, until, with the faintest nebulae that can be detected with the greatest telescopes, we arrive at the frontier of the known universe.. -Edwin Hubble,.. Realm of the Nebulae.. 1936.. Galactic Encounters (3:11)..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: "A process somewhat analogous to that of the alleged formations of the universe, time and times ago, was observable.. The bustling swarm had swept the sky in a scattered and uniform haze, which now thickened to a nebulous centre: this glided on to a bough and grew still denser, till it formed a solid  ...   Bees,.. Far from the Madding Crowd.. 1874.. Swarm (2:14).. By increasing the playback speed, we get a different impression of the dynamical processes in galaxy clusters.. Here we look at the cluster from the.. previous track.. again but from 3 different fixed perspectives and also speed up the playback to 200 million years per second..

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  • Title: Galaxy Dynamics
    Descriptive info: "Through it shone the Stars!.. Not Earth's feeble thirty-six hundred Stars visible to the eye; Lagash was in the center of a giant cluster.. Thirty thousand might suns shone down in a soul-searing splendor that was more frighteningly cold in its awful indifference than the bitter wind that shivered across the cold horribly bleak world.. -Isaac Asimov,.. , Astounding Science Fiction, September 1941.. Nightfall  ...   into the sky and perceives the fantastic view of a sky filled with tens of thousands of stars for he lives on a planet at the heart of a globular cluster! I have visualized the stars in the animation to reflect the true colour and brightness distribution in globular clusters and reproduce the look of Hubble Space Telescope images of.. globular star clusters.. accurately..

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  • Archived pages: 27