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    Archived pages: 33 . Archive date: 2013-05.

  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: .. National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD).. Home.. About Us.. Board & Advisory Council.. Current & Past Funders.. The Problem.. The Solution.. Parent Network.. Parent Leadership.. Advocacy Trainings.. Personal Stories.. The Law.. Characteristics.. IDEA 2004.. Psychologists.. 504 Plans.. NCLB.. Attorneys.. News.. Resources.. Glossary.. Newsletters.. Parent Handbook.. Organizations.. Financial Assistance.. Membership.. Donations.. Contact Us.. Advocating for African American families with children who learn differently.. Welcome!.. The AACLD is continually updating this website in order to bring you as much information and as many resources as possible.. If the information you are seeking is not here, please.. contact us.. Please remember that in the present day  ...   must be committed to learning as much as possible about how to exercise their rights and responsibilities under federal law and use that knowledge throughout their child's education.. The educational success of our children depends on each of us.. The AACLD wishes for you and your family a very successful and rewarding journey!.. Connect with Us!.. Join our FREE Email Mailing List.. Facebook.. LinkedIn.. Google+.. Noteworthy Links.. Parent Advocacy Trainings.. Donate Now.. or.. Become A.. Member.. Most Recent Newsletter.. 2010 Annual Report, "Looking Back.. The First Ten Years".. Find a Parent Leader in Your State.. AACLD Fact Sheet.. AACLD, P.. O.. Box 09521, Columbus, Ohio 43209 Phone: (614) 237-6021.. info@aacld.. org..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: The AACLD is a non profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 2000 by a mother and her two sons for the purpose of increasing awareness in minority communities about learning differences and promoting parent advocacy.. For more than a decade the family had struggled with academic challenges that seemed almost insurmountable at times.. The maze they traveled for academic success resulted in a strong desire to make the road easier for other  ...   American families throughout the United States.. In addition, it has continued to serve the broader public by responding to an extraordinary number of requests for information nationwide from a very diverse audience including teachers, public and private K-12 schools, colleges and universities, social service agencies, psychologists, hospitals, churches, lawyers, parent groups, and other organizations.. Click below to read more about the AACLD:.. Board of Trustees Professional Advisory Council.. Current Past Funders..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: Board of Trustees.. Linda James Myers, Ph.. D.. The Ohio State University.. Chair.. Elsie Blount, President.. Uniglobe Travel Designers, Inc.. Past Chair.. Nancy R.. Tidwell, President.. NRT Associates, Inc.. Founder President.. Janice Smith Boyd.. Parent Child Advocate.. Gwen Cartledge, Ph.. Cynthia S.. Gardner, M.. ED.. School Counselor.. Ralph Gardner, Ph.. Ted Ginn, Sr.. , Executive Director.. Cleveland Ginn Academy.. James L.. Moore III, Ph.. Melissa S.. Tidwell.. Corporate Counsel, Google Inc.. Stan Trent, Ph.. University of Virginia.. Trustees Emeriti.. Oscar Watson.. Laurence W.. Zoeller.. Co-Founders.. Donald  ...   State University.. Beth Harry, Ph.. University of Miami.. Joseph F.. Johnson, Jr.. , Ph.. San Diego State University.. Cathy D.. Kea, Ph.. N.. Carokina A T State University.. Jonathan Kozol.. Author Educator.. Jawanza Kunjufu, Ph.. Eductional Consultant.. Daniel Losen, J.. , M.. Ed.. The Civil Rights Project at UCLA.. James Marlin Patton, Ph.. The College of William and Mary.. Rosa A.. Smith.. Educational Consultant.. Brenda L.. Townsend, Ph.. University of South Florida.. Floyd Weatherspoon, Professor.. Capital University Law School.. Gwen Webb-Johnson, Ph.. Texas A M University..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: Current and Past Funders.. The AACLD gratefully acknowledges the following for their financial contributions to our programs and services:.. Google Matching Gifts Program.. Grange Insurance.. IBM Employee/Retiree Charitable Contribution Campaign.. Ingram White Castle Foundation.. National Smart Set.. Nationwide Foundation.. Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.. Oak Foundation.. Ohio Governor's Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives.. Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.. Pew Matching Gifts Program.. Schwab Learning.. Sodexo.. The Columbus Foundation.. Tremaine Foundation..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: Since the 1960's, the disproportionate representation of African American children in special education has received national attention.. A series of national studies released in 2001 by The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University concluded "school districts nationwide continue to improperly and disproportionately place minority students in special education classes despite an increase in civil rights protections and special education services over the past 25 years.. " Statistics from the U.. S.. Department of Education, Office for Special Education Programs for Fall 2008 show that although African Americans represented just 15% of all students, they represented 21% of students in the special education category of specific learning disabilities, 29% in the category of emotional disturbance, and 31% in the category of mental retardation.. The dropout rate among minority children with disabilities has been exceedingly higher than whites.. Other failing students act out their feelings and become behavioral problems building defenses that only get them in more trouble.. The challenge of educating these children is further exacerbated by the advent of zero tolerance policies.. Statistics around these policies show that African American students are suspended or expelled up to five times more than white students even though research dispels a simplistic explanation of a disproportionate level  ...   Special Education, in Racial Inequity in Special Education, 2002.. The poverty theory also fails to explain why gross racial disparities are only found in the categories of mental retardation and emotional disturbance, and not in the categories of specific learning disability or any medically diagnosed disabilities.. There is also no agreed upon explanation for the broader scale achievement gap which is actually wider between middle income African American and white students, or the success of so many schools in low income African American communities who have produced students well above the national average.. Special education is intended to provide support and services to help students with disabilities learn to their full potential.. Historically, special education has too often been a place to segregate minorities and students with disabilities.. Disproportionate representation (Oswald, Coutinho, Best, and Singh, 1999) is defined as the extent to which membership in a given ethnic group affects the probability of being placed in a specific special education disability category.. To the extent that minority students are misclassified, segregated, or inadequately served, special education can contribute to a denial of equality of opportunity, with devastating results in communities throughout the nation (Harvard Civil Rights Project, Conference on Minority Issues in Special Education, 2000)..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: Although the input of teachers, principals, and school psychologists is important in the identification of children for special education services, parents cannot allow these decisions to depend solely on the opinions of school personnel.. Parents.. must.. be aggressive and actively seek information about their legal rights and responsibilities provided under Federal and State law.. They.. learn to understand their children's educational needs and then become their children's strongest advocate.. Many African American children have been misdiagnosed and inappropriately referred for special education services but the reality is that the current legal process must be used to obtain the appropriate services and supports that every child is entitled and needs for school and later life success.. Parents should not resist evaluations for a child who is struggling but they should be vigilant, making sure that the findings are accurate and that the interventions rendered result in continuous academic and social progress.. Parents can become involved in the special needs decision-making process for their children by learning about the Federal law that guarantees a "free appropriate public education" for all children the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA).. Although there are widespread reports of noncompliance by the majority of States, this law clearly defines parents' rights and responsibilities.. Knowledge of the law will help parents to force compliance and access the services their children need.. See.. page on this website.. It is also important for parents to become familiar  ...   finally depend on how we feel about the fact that we haven't so far.. ".. Ronald Edmonds, Harvard University.. Research has demonstrated that the education of children with disabilities can be made more effective by strengthening the role of parents.. The AACLD offers the following opportunities:.. The Parent Network was established for the purpose of keeping families informed about new developments in the field of special education.. Members are encouraged to share this information with others in order to raise the level of community awareness.. Parent Leadership Institute Trained Parent Advocates.. Through the creation of a Parent Leadership Institute (PLI), the AACLD is striving to reach an unprecedented number of African American families by selecting proven advocacy leaders in strategic locations throughout the United States to serve as its primary members.. The AACLD was awarded a grant to conduct advocacy trainings for African American parent leaders nationwide with the intent of creating a movement for change that results in an improved and socially just quality of education.. Additionally, the AACLD periodically offers a free, online course for individuals interested in beginning or enhancing local efforts to help families with children who are struggling to learn.. The AACLD is collecting stories from students with learning disabilities and parents and professionals from across the country that through personal experience and knowledge of what has worked, will teach us all how to become better advocates.. These personal stories will be published periodically..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: The AACLD has established a Parent Network for the purpose of keeping families informed about new developments in the field of special education, primarily focusing on African American children with learning disabilities.. Network members are encouraged to share this information with others in order to raise the level of awareness in communities across the  ...   from families about their experiences with learning problems.. This information will help the organization to better fulfill its role as an advocate for African American children with learning disabilities.. If you would like to become a member of the Parent Network, please.. Join Our Mailing List.. form, or visit the.. page for more information..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: Parent Leadership Institute.. Trained Parent Advocates.. Sometimes parents find it difficult to express their feelings when they are sitting alone with a team of experts who might tend to dictate the content, tone, and outcome of a school meeting about a child's progress.. Therefore, it is wise for parents to get information from or take with them a trained advocate or another individual who knows their child.. Finding a trained advocate who is also culturally sensitive can be difficult.. The goal of the PLI is not to only bring together passionate parent advocates but to provide a united voice on public policy issues.. Members of the PLI have demonstrated their commitment to making change and bettering the lives of children who have previously been misunderstood, mislabeled, and underrepresented in the fight for educational rights.. Many PLI members are African American parents, grandparents, or other individuals with experience  ...   information.. If you would like to become a member of the Parent Leadership Institute, please.. Join Out Mailing List.. or visit the.. To find a parent leader in your state,.. click here.. NOTE:.. Although the PLI is growing rapidly, there are not enough members now to serve the many parents in need throughout the country.. Therefore, families in need of advocacy information should be aware of the federally funded.. Parent Training and Information Centers and Community Parent Resource Centers.. Each state is home to at least one parent center.. The level of services and cultural competency varies.. Parents should also check with the office of special education within their state department of education and public school district to determine how to find a parent advocate close to home.. The AACLD will continue to receive inquiries, preferably by email, from parents and respond to them as quickly as possible..

    Original link path: /thesolution/parentleadership.html
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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: PARENT ADVOCACY TRAININGS.. (Nationwide, 2012-2014).. The AACLD is stepping up its efforts.. AACLD Symposium and Training for Selected Parent Leaders to Be Held June 2014.. Following on the heels of a successful parent advocacy leadership training in August 2012 and the overwhelming demand to participate, the AACLD is excited to announce that we will host an even larger symposium and training.. June 23-26, 2014.. The goal is to double the number of parent leaders as participants in order to significantly increase the number of families reached nationwide.. African American parent leaders from across the country will be selected from a growing pool of applicants to participate and receive the culturally syntonic training, which will.. strongly.. focus on the tools needed to assist families in disadvantaged communities.. These tools will include, but not be limited to, a newly revised and more comprehensive parent handbook, a training manual on special education, and toolkits for advocacy at all levels.. Training participants will be selected based on demonstrated leadership ability, access to families in targeted communities, and commitment to training parents to be effective advocates for their children in the struggle for academic success.. They will gain from expert presenters and trainers insight on the challenges facing African American children with learning differences and acquire the skills to assist and support parents in some of the most vulnerable neighborhoods in the country.. Travel and hotel accommodations will be provided for all participants; however, they must be or become members of the AACLD.. If you are a parent leader and would like to attend this precedent-setting event,.. to complete the online questionnaire.. Click here.. to access information about student, individual, non-profit, corporate, and lifetime memberships.. The AACLD launched.. Empowering Parents for African American Student Achievement.. ,.. a series of of nationwide parent advocacy trainings, August 10-12, 2012 in Columbus, Ohio.. The event was co-hosted by The Ohio State University Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race Ethnicity and the Todd A.. Bell National  ...   Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University.. Gene T.. Harris, Superintendent, Columbus City Schools.. James Moore, Director, Todd A.. Bell National Resource Center on the African American Male, The Ohio State University.. Thomas Rudd, Director of Education Emerging Research.. ,.. OSU Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race Ethnicity.. Stanley C.. Trent, Associate Professor, Department of Curriculum, Instruction Special Education, University of Virginia.. Perry Williams, Project Officer, Regional Resource Center Program (RRCP), Office of Special Education Program, U.. Department of Education.. See the.. "News".. section.. for more information.. Read a letter of support from Ohio Supreme Court Justice Yvette McGee Brown.. here.. Attended the Columbus, OH training?.. to access the parent leader training materials.. ONLINE PARENT TRAINING.. The AACLD also offers a free, online course,.. Beginning Advocacy in the African American Community.. that is based on the.. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.. (IDEA), the federal law that entitles all eligible school-aged children with disabilities to receive a "free appropriate public education.. ".. Topics include: understanding the law, disproportionality, early intervention, response to intervention, evaluation, identification, discipline, standards of advocacy, working with families, available resources, and more.. This high quality, culturally appropriate training is offered periodically and includes a pre- and post-training questionnaire to determine level of competency and eligibility for a certificate of completion.. The requirements for participation are: (1) a commitment to serve one's community, (2) a statement of interest and/or experience in working with communities, and (3) a willingness to become a member of the.. Parent Leadership Institute.. for the purpose of referring local families in need of information and support.. Individuals interested in participating in any AACLD training must complete the pre-training questionnaire.. This collection of information will help us to determine the strengths and weaknesses of trainees and help guide our future training activities.. To access the pre-training questionnaire for completion online, please.. Additional details on format and schedule will be sent.. only.. to those individuals who have submitted a.. completed.. pre-training questionnaire..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: The.. AACLD.. recently received a multi-year grant to support and grow parent advocacy in African American communities nationwide.. As a part of this journey, we are collecting personal stories from students with learning disabilities and parents and professionals from across the country, that through personal experience and the knowledge of what has worked teach us all how to become better advocates for our children.. If you would like to submit a personal story for consideration, please email.. with your story.. Never, Ever Give Up.. By Christina Cruce, B.. The College of Wooster 2012.. I have always been terrible at math.. From as early as I can remember I have always felt dumb or inferior in math because I had to ask for help from those around me, whether they were my teachers, my classmates or my parents.. When I was nine, I was diagnosed with dyscalculia, a math related learning disability.. Though it was not until high school that I learned my actual diagnosis and what it meant for me going forward in school.. My mother always told me that I was on an IEP because I was LD, which she told me meant that I learned differently.. The concept of learning differently made plenty of sense to me.. From fourth grade until my high school graduation, I had always been allowed to take my tests in a different, quieter room and I was always allowed to ask for help from either my teacher or my test proctor.. My math teachers always made certain accommodations for me.. Where I attended high school, students were required to take three years of science, three years of history, four years of English and four years of math.. This always seemed so unfair, somewhat unbalanced to me because for as bad as I was at math, and science too for that matter, I truly excelled in English and even more so in history.. In fact when I was diagnosed as LD in the fourth grade, I was reading on a college level.. Surprise the gifted and talented team never showed any interest in me until my junior year of high school.. As you can imagine my plate was full and frankly, I didn t have any interest in them.. History and English proved to be my strong points.. They kept me up when I was feeling down.. In fact, this month I will earn my college degree in history.. At any rate there was no way around taking multiple math courses and staying on a college prep track in school.. There was no way around it.. Trust me, between my mother and I, we tried to find another way.. But, I had to stick with math.. As you can imagine math and I had some pretty tough battles; we fought hard in Algebra I and II, and I nearly faltered in Geometry, but because of the support of those around me and my strong will to succeed I passed with a C+.. When it came time to choose a college, I was determined to pick a good, small school that did not require me to take any math.. Of course, it didn t work out that way.. I found the College of Wooster, in Ohio and I fell in love right away with its picturesque beauty, great traditions and its quest for excellence.. The College is a liberal arts college, which meant I had to take at least an additional semester of math.. I was lucky because my professor was very helpful and further because the college boasts a wonderful Learning Center.. This is  ...   meeting.. With each spring comes a new flood of parents -- nervous, intimidated, and unaware of what they cannot possibly know.. No other path in our lives leads us to this place where for an hour or more school personnel in.. their.. space and with.. their.. knowledge talk to us about.. our.. children.. It can be one of the most painful, uncomfortable settings that parents find themselves in.. If IEP meetings weren't so important, most of us would get up and leave! I know because I have been there.. I sat at that table each year for nine years until my daughter graduated from high school.. I am both blessed and cursed because I am an assertive woman.. I have a degree in Interpersonal Communications and rarely do I shy away from asking difficult questions.. That is why I have dedicated the last six years of my life as a.. parent mentor.. to help others who don't have the same tool set, but certainly can learn.. My belief is that if you are going to tell me about my daughter's problems, I am going to ask you about reasonable solutions.. It's not personal at the IEP table -- it's all business.. While these well-meaning people had my daughter for one school year at a time, I have her for a lifetime.. I wanted to see her flourish and become everything she could be.. I knew things about her that they couldn't even imagine.. I watched her grow and stumble.. I knew her strengths and weaknesses.. The school didn't lower the bar for her -- we insisted that it work with us to give her the tools to jump over that bar.. I tell parents, "claim your spot at that head of the table" for that is where you belong.. School personnel are, in essence, reporting to.. you.. Arrive early for the meeting because it shows that you are serious.. Look the part -- let your attire show them that you mean business.. Sit up strong and proud for this is your child they are talking about! You are there as your child's strongest advocate.. Be polite because nothing is more disarming.. Don't be a pushover, stand your ground! Don't be intimidated by titles of.. Dr.. This.. That.. for your title is far more important -- you are "Mom" or "Dad" or "Grandparent" or "somebody that loves a special needs child.. " You are worthy of respect.. Be thoughtful and listen with willing ears.. If you don't know what you want to do at the end of the meeting, tell them you would like to "digest" the information and you will get back to them in a reasonable amount of time.. You are off to a great start because you are learning about this new role you find yourself in.. It is intimidating for sure, but.. nothing worthwhile comes easy.. and what could be more important than making sure your child gets the services he or she needs and deserves.. Every school year will be different, but that's okay, because with every new year you will find yourself more prepared than you ever thought possible.. And then, your child will make your proud.. My daughter graduates from college this spring and I couldn't be any prouder! For all of the IEP meetings, calls to teachers and times of simply "wringing my hands," she made it.. When she walks across that stage to receive her diploma, I will say to myself "job well done!" We did it and so can you.. Walk strong and remember to sit at the head of the table!..

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  • Title: National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD)
    Descriptive info: The Law.. Defining a Learning Disability.. The federal law that supports special education and related service programming for children and youth with disabilities is called the.. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).. It entitles all eligible school-aged children and youth with disabilities to receive a "free appropriate public education.. " The regulations for this law define a learning disability as "a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell or do mathematical calculations, including conditions such as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia.. However, learning disabilities do not include, "learning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbance, or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage.. " 34.. Code of Federal Regulations.. S300.. 7(c)(10).. Click on the links below to learn more:.. Characteristics of a Child with a Learning Disability.. Learning disabilities in school children are characterized by a significant difference in achievement as compared to his or her overall intelligence.. While quite normal, even  ...   by the majority of states.. Psychologists: Accessing Special Education Services Under IDEA.. Before a child with a disability can receive special education and related services for the first time, a full and individual initial evaluation of the child, must be conducted.. Informed parent consent is required before this evaluation may be conducted.. Section 504 Rehabilitation Act of 1973.. Sometimes children with special needs do not qualify for special education services but he or she might be eligible for a "504 Plan.. " Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is a federal statute that protects individuals with disabilities from discrimination in programs that receive federal funds.. No Child Left Behind Act (2001).. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) is the nation's major federal law for education in grades pre-kindergarten through high school.. It was originally known as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), which was enacted to address the inequality of educational opportunity for economically underserved children.. Attorneys and Legal Action.. Although the AACLD does not make recommendations or provide endorsements for services, this information is provided as a source for parent review and determination of need for services..

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  • Archived pages: 33