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    Archived pages: 18 . Archive date: 2013-12.

  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: .. Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority.. Preserving the Resource for Future Generations.. Home.. About us.. Fishing Regulations.. Net Marking.. Treaties & Court Decisions.. Links.. Publications.. Archives.. Contact Us.. Welcome! Boozhoo! Aaniin!.. gathers all 1836 Treaty fishing tribes under its mantle:.. Bay Mills Indian Community.. ,.. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians.. Little River Band of Ottawa Indians.. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians.. Sault Ste.. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians..  ...   resource entity chairperson.. Under the CORA charter two committees were established: Great Lakes Resource Committee to serve as inter-tribal management body for the 1836 Treaty fishery and the Inland Lands and Waters Resources Committee to oversee inland resource matters.. The 1836 Treaty fishery continues to be one of the most regulated fisheries on the Great Lakes, subject to regulations under CORA, the tribes,.. FDA HACCP seafood safety.. and.. US Coast Guard maritime safety..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: CORA BOARD MEMBERS 2013.. Bay Mills Indian Community Representatives:.. Kurt Perron, President (CORA Chairman).. Donald Tadgerson, Conservation Committee Chair (ILWRC Vice-Chairman).. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Representatives:.. Alvin Al Pedwaydon, Chairman.. Tom Shomin, Natural Resources Committee Chair (CORA Vice-Chairman).. Little River Band of Ottawa Indians.. Representatives:.. Larry Romanelli, Tribal Ogema/ Jimmie Mitchell, Proxy Representative.. Ben Hamilton, Natural Resources Commission Chair.. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians.. Fred Kiogima, Chairman (GLRC Vice-Chairman).. Daugherty Johnson, Natural Resources Commission Chairman (ILWRC  ...   CORA Charter.. Fishery Management.. CORA provides biological services to ensure proper regulations of tribal fisheries and cooperative management with state and federal agencies.. Read More.. Fishery Enhancement.. Nunns Creek Fish Hatchery raises walleye and other species to stock the Great Lakes and serves as the center for monitoring and management of salmon harvested by the tribal commercial fishery.. Fish Monitoring.. ITFAP conducts annual fish contaminant monitoring by sampling important commercial species.. Results are shared with state and federal agencies and the public..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: The purpose of the CORA and its member tribes’ recreation, commercial and subsistence fishing regulations is to ensure conservation of fishery resources in the treaty-ceded waters in the state of Michigan for the continued use and enjoyment by Indian tribes and all other persons entitled to use the resources.. CORA's commercial and subsistence fishing regulations were adopted in 2000.. The regulations are derived from those of the predecessor organization COTFMA, which were adopted in 1982.. Regulatory changes are approved and adopted by the CORA board when necessary.. The CORA regulations contain the following general information: purpose of the regulations, definition of terms, scope and application of regulations, license definition and restrictions, and identification.. Specific regulations are addressed by area, gear, species and area closures, season and zone.. Requirements for catch reporting, wholesale and retail reporting, and subsistence and assessment fishing activities are described in detail.. Jurisdiction and enforcement, criminal penalties, powers of the CORA Board, and access site regulations are also included.. Copies of the CORA regulations are available at the CORA office and can also be seen here:.. CORA CODE.. Law Enforcement.. Tribal conservation officers are trained at federal or state police academies.. They perform all conservation enforcement investigations and services in treaty waters, enforce fishing regulations, and work  ...   its fishers.. Tribal conservation officers cooperate with the Michigan DNR, U.. Coast Guard, Border Patrol and other duly recognized agencies to enforce commercial and subsistence fishing activities and safety regulations.. Tribal conservation officers and state conservation officers have the authority to cite tribal recreational, commercial and subsistence fishers for civil and criminal infractions.. When tribal fishers are cited for a violation, they are ordered into a tribal court for judgment.. Fines of various amounts, revocation of fishing license and forfeiture of the catch and equipment are some of the penalties levied.. Tribal, federal and state conservation officers recognize the need to enforce regulations fairly and uniformly.. The Executive Council's Law Enforcement Committee is composed of tribal, federal, and state conservation officers.. It is responsible for resolving multi-jurisdictional enforcement fishery issues.. Each of the five tribes has conservation officers who enforce recreational, commercial, subsistence, and vessel safety regulations in the treaty waters of the Great Lakes.. Tribal conservation officers receive mandatory police, firearm, and first aid training.. Tribal conservation officers are required to attend annual training seminars and are advised of regulatory changes and updates.. Each officer is trained to enforce federal and tribal regulations.. In addition to mandatory training and instruction, tribal conservation wardens receive vessel safety, navigation and rescue training..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: On the upper Great Lakes, boaters and anglers need to know how to identify and avoid commercial fishing nets.. Three types of nets used are gill nets, trap nets and salmon nets.. Net Descriptions.. Salmon Nets.. Trap Nets.. Gill Nets.. Tribal members with subsistence fishing licenses may also set nets on the Great Lakes: “Subsistence nets shall be marked at each end with an orange float equivalent to at least a one (1) gallon jug in size bearing the tribal ID number of the subsistence fisher.. These nets will not exceed 300 feet.. ”.. Vessel operators should navigate away from all markers and are encouraged to remain 1,500 feet away from any staff buoy or jug used to mark nets.. Recreational boaters should be aware  ...   Lake Superior.. Unmarked or improperly marked nets should be reported to state and tribal law enforcement officials or to the DNR RAP Hotline at 1-800-292-7800.. It is a federal offense to remove or tamper with legally set tribal commercial fishing gear in the Great Lakes.. Removal of net marking staff buoys and jugs results in the commercial fishermen not being able to locate the net and increases vessel navigation concerns for other boaters.. If you should become entangled, follow these safety tips:.. — Snagged downrigger cables can be quite dangerous.. — Always keep bow of boat facing into sea.. — Release any tension on downrigger cables and cut.. — If prop becomes tangled shut off engine completely.. — Radio U.. — Do not enter water..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: The Treaties.. 1836 Treaty tribes' right to conduct fishing activities is derived from the terms of the 1836 Treaty between the United States government and Ottawa and Chippewa Indians.. The treaty gave up land but retained the right to hunt and fish in the treaty-ceded territory.. These rights were reaffirmed in court cases during the 1970s.. What is a Treaty?.. A treaty is a mechanism used by the United States government to give its word to another government, and that word is not eroded by the passage of time.. According to the United States Constitution, treaties are the “supreme law of the land.. Accurate treaty interpretation is a sophisticated and complex legal issue.. The body of treaty law is vast and continues to grow.. Federal court involvement is often required to interpret treaties.. The courts provide a thorough and well-researched legal interpretation, which serves as a foundation for common understanding of reserved treaty rights.. This foundation promotes public understanding and acceptance of reserved rights.. How treaties between the U.. and Indian tribes came about.. Before the arrival of non-Indian people to North America, the landmass of the continent was completely controlled by native tribal entities.. Tribes had all the rights of ownership, including the right to use the land and water resources as they desired.. Following European arrival, new settlements were established.. These settlements needed land and its resources.. Sometimes lands were obtained through warfare, but more often by negotiation or purchase.. Treaties were the legal documents used to settle wars or to record the details of negotiation or purchase.. Treaties were developed between tribal government and the government of the United States.. Land conveyed by tribes in treaties is called ceded land.. Prior to 1808, tribal groups in Michigan inhabited most of the 57,000 square miles that comprise the state.. By 1864, tribal lands amounted to only 32 square miles of Michigan, the rest ceded in treaties with the United States government.. Before European occupation, tribes had complete sovereign power over their territory.. In many cases, tribes retained some rights of ownership when treaties were negotiated.. While tribes might exchange a territory for peaceful relationships, money or other considerations, they might decide to retain certain areas for tribal use, or to retain the right to continue some tribal activities on the ceded land.. Fishing or hunting on ceded territory was a right of ownership retained by the tribes, not given up in treaty provisions.. The Nature of Treaty Rights.. Treaty rights pertaining to hunting and fishing are very similar to contemporary property rights.. Retaining certain rights when land is sold is a common practice in today's land sales.. A property owner might decide to sell land, but retain some property right such as an easement  ...   At the same time they reserved the right to fish in the ceded waters of the Great Lakes.. Because of the documented evidence demonstrating that the Indians were absolutely dependent upon fishing for subsistence and their livelihood, and reading the treaty as the Indians would have understood it, they would not have relinquished their right to fish in the ceded waters of the Great Lakes.. Since the treaty does not contain language granting away the prior right to fish, that right remains with the Indians and was confirmed by the 1836 treaty.. (United States v.. State of Michigan V.. Conclusions of the Law B.. Canons of Treaty Construction [26].. ).. The 1836 Treaty.. After a series of court cases, both the Michigan State Supreme Court and the federal courts affirmed that the 1836 treaty reserved the right to fish under tribal authority in treaty-ceded Great Lakes waters.. Treaty language from the 1830s and 1840s regarding these rights can seem difficult to interpret in today's terms.. A section of the 1836 Treaty of Washington, has the following language:.. Article thirteenth.. The Indians stipulate for the right of hunting on the lands ceded, with the other usual privileges of occupancy, until the land is required for settlement.. District Judge Noel Fox discussed Article Thirteenth in the court case United States v.. The language contained in Article Thirteenth of the Treaty of 1836, by its own terms could not have limited the Indians 'right to fish in the waters of the Great Lakes because these large bodies of water could not possibly be settled by homes, barns and tilled fields.. While the Indians might have been willing to give up their right to hunt on various parcels of land as that land became occupied with settlers, the vital right to fish in the Great Lakes was something that the Indians understood would not be taken from them and, indeed, there was no need to do so.. Canons of Treaty Construction [27].. In People v.. LeBlanc, the Michigan Supreme Court came to the same conclusion as Judge Fox:.. the ceded water areas of the Great Lakes have obviously not been required for settlement, and therefore the fishing rights reserved by the Chippewas in these areas have not been terminated.. (People v.. LeBlanc, supra, 248 N.. W.. 2d at 207.. ).. Read the Treaties.. 1855 July 31 Treaty.. 1819 September 24 Treaty.. 1842 October 4 Treaty.. 1836 March 28 Treaty.. 1833 September 27 Treaty.. 1833 September 26 Treaty.. 1828 September 20 Treaty.. 1821 August 29 Treaty.. 1820 Sault Ste.. Marie.. 1807 November 17 Treaty.. Read the Court Decisions.. US v Michigan.. People v LeBlanc.. 2007 Inland Consent Decree.. Read a timeline of the 1836 treaty fishery.. Upper Great Lakes Tribal Fishery Chronology..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: Lynx ~ Bizhiw.. CORA MEMBER TRIBES.. MEMBER TRIBES' NATURAL RESOURCES.. GTB Natural Resources.. LRB Natural Resources.. LTBB Natural Resources.. Sault Tribe Conservation.. TRIBAL WEBSITES.. Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Commission.. Midwest Alliance of Sovereign Tribes.. United Tribes of Michigan.. Native American Fish Wildlife Society.. PRODUCTS RECIPES.. Lake Superior Tribal Fisheries.. Great Lakes Whitefish.. Seafood Watch.. Ojibwe Wild Rice.. RELATED WESBITES.. US EPA American Indian Tribal Portal.. Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment.. Michigan SeaGrant.. Great Lakes Information Network.. USFWS Fisheries and Habitat Conservation.. Bureau of Indian Affairs..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: CORA Brochure.. 1836 Treaty Fishery of the Great Lakes Anishinaabe.. Eat Fish Wisely.. 1836 Treaty Fishing Guide.. Fish is Healthy Eating..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: CORA newsletter.. (The CORA newsletter is no longer published but made available for research and informational purposes.. CORA newsletter V10N2.. CORA newsletter V10N1.. CORA newsletter V9N6.. CORA newsletter V9N5.. CORA newsletter V9N4.. CORA newsletter V9N3.. CORA newsletter V9N2.. CORA newsletter V9N1.. CORA newsletter V8N6.. CORA newsletter V8N5.. CORA newsletter V8N4.. CORA  ...   V7N4.. CORA newsletter V7N3.. CORA newsletter V7N2.. CORA newsletter V7N1.. CORA newsletter V6N3.. CORA newsletter V6N1.. CORA newsletter V5N6.. CORA newsletter V5N4.. CORA newsletter V5N3.. CORA newsletter V5N2.. CORA newsletter V5N1.. CORA newsletter V4N5.. CORA newsletter V4N4.. CORA newsletter V4N3.. CORA newsletter V4N2.. CORA newsletter V4N1.. CORA newsletter V3N5.. CORA newsletter V3N4..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: Questions or comments?.. Please contact the CORA office at.. 179 W.. Three Mile Rd.. , Sault Ste.. Marie, MI, 49783.. Phone: (906) 632-0043.. Fax: (906) 632-1141..

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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: CORA provides biological services that ensure proper regulation of tribal fisheries and cooperative management with federal and state agencies.. The Intertribal Fisheries Assessment Program (ITFAP) serves as the center for fishery catch statistics, recommends harvest levels, carries out population research and studies, and represents CORA on numerous interagency committees and organizations..

    Original link path: /Fishery-Management.php
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  • Title: Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority
    Descriptive info: Nunns Creek Fish Hatchery is an ongoing effort to strengthen and improve the Great Lakes fishery resource.. Nunns Creek raises walleye, salmon and other species to stock Great Lakes waters.. Since it opened in 1989, the hatchery has served as the center for monitoring and management of salmon harvested by tribal commercial fishermen.. CORA tribes have helped to reestablish lake trout in the upper Great Lakes, and have been especially successful in Lake Superior.. Each CORA tribe has a biological services program that cooperates with ITFAP, Michigan DNR, and federal and binational agencies and governments to manage and maintain Great Lakes fish stocks.. All biological agencies on the Great Lakes work toward sea lamprey eradication.. Recent examples of other cooperative efforts include:.. Planting lake trout eggs on historic spawning reefs.. Spring and fall lake trout assessments.. Habitat inventories and mapping projects.. Lake Michigan yellow perch assessments.. Seasonal whitefish studies.. Tribal biologists are responsible for coordinating activities and research that evaluate Great Lakes fish stocks and maintain or improve fishery habitat.. Annual projects conducted by these programs include commercial harvest monitoring, lake trout and walleye population assessment, whitefish recruitment, forage fish surveys, and water  ...   in the eastern Upper Peninsula from Munising to St.. Ignace.. Tribal biological staff and ITFAP participate in many interagency fishery and environmental committees, task forces, commissions and advisory teams on a state, national and international level.. Tribal biological staff have been members of or have actively participated in all the Lake Committees and their Technical Committees, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the Integrated Management of Sea Lamprey, the Great Lakes Fish Health Committee, the Council of Great Lakes Fishery Agencies, the International Joint Commission’s Lake Michigan Lakewide Management Plan, St.. Marys Remedial Action Plan, Binational Program for Lake Superior, Binational Superior Work Group, Great Lakes Council of Governors, Fish Consumption Advisory Task Force, Great Lakes Panel on Exotic Species, Great Lakes Water Quality Guidance, Great Lakes United, Michigan Aquaculture Advisory Committee, the Technical Fisheries Review Committee and the Technical Fishery Committee.. Tribal biologists have given presentations at many environmental and fishery management functions, from a local Sierra Club to the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society.. They have contributed or served as editors to such publications as the Lake Trout Rehabilitation Guide; State of the Lake Report; and Fish Community Objectives for Lake Superior..

    Original link path: /Fishery-Enhancement.php
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  • Archived pages: 18